The Formation of Groups & Teams
Topics: Group dynamics, Goal, Organizational studies and human resource management, Group development, Organization, Sociology / Pages: 12 (3761 words) / Published: Jul 25th, 2014

Running head:, THE FORMATION OF GROUPS & TEAMS

The Formation of Groups & Teams
Embry Riddle Aeronautical University
MGMT 317 Organizational Behavior

In this paper I will explain how and why teams and groups are formed, the different types of groups and effectiveness of work groups. The process of a group activity is the interaction and mutual influence among group members as they complete the group activity, communication, leadership, conflict, conflict resolutions and norms of behavior in the group. A group is two or more people who interact with each other to achieve certain goals or needs. The purpose is to accomplish the same goal using my skills, personalities, abilities and experiences to be more effective. “Group forming is a process and there are five stages for group development: forming, storming, norming, performing and adjourning.” (Hunter, Dale, Bailey, Anne, Taylor, Bill, 1995). Some characteristics of work groups that influence or affect the way members behave in the area of group performance can include the group size, group composition, group function, group status, group efficacy and social facilitation. Groups control their members with roles and rules. Role is the division of work among the group members. Rules are made to control group behavior. Work groups establish goals to achieve, using all members’ skills, abilities and experiences. I intend to explain about process loss and process gain. This includes the characteristics that contribute process gain and sources that influence process loss. For example, small groups are considered to be process gain, because it’s a small group, they have better communication and it’s easy to get to know each other better. “There are also sources of potential process loss. This can be social loafing, member negativity. It means sources that don’t permit to achieve the goals or achieving



References: Houldworth, Chris, Mathews, Brian (2000), Group Composition, Performance and Educational Attainment, Education & Training. London: 2000. Vol. 42, Iss. Periodical. Hunter, Dale, Bailey, Anne, Taylor, Bill (1995), The Handbook for People Meeting with a Purpose: The Zen of Groups. Fisher Books. Kane, M. 1997. How to Distinguish the Important Differences Between Teams and Work Groups. Vandeveer, Menefee, Sinclair Wittenbaum, G.M. (Oct. 1, 2003). Putting Communication into the Study of Group Memory. Human Communication Research. Vol. 29, No.4, Proquest Psychology Journals, pg. 616.

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