The Five Senses

Better Essays
Neuroscience: The Five Senses

Brandt 2

Table of Contents:

Introduction: …………………………….3
Sense 1: Taste……………………………3-4
Sense 2: Smell…………………………...4-6
Sense 3: Sight……………………………6-7
Sense 4: Hearing…………………………7-9
Sense 5: Touch…………………………..9-11
Conclusion: ……………………………...11

Brandt 3
Neuroscience is the study of the nervous system and anything that is involved with the nervous system. They are many different areas in the field if neuroscience. Neuroscience deals with the five senses, anything connected to the nervous system, the brain, anything that sends information to and from the brain, etc. Many of these things go from simple ideas and concepts to the complex coding of the brain, and everything in between. One of the areas of study that can go from being simple to complex easily is the study of the five senses, sight, hearing, taste, smell, and touch.
These five senses may seem simple to describe and easy to define, but they are some of the most complex functions in the human body. Some might say, "How does this pertain to neuroscience?", and this is a logical question. The answer to that is that each of these five senses involves neurons, and these neurons have to be dealt with. The bodily function that deals with these neurons is the nervous system. In fact that is all the nervous system deals with, it 's a sort of second brain for neurons.
The first of these senses is taste, or gustation. Taste, as everyone knows, is what happens when some thing is placed on the tongue. A more technical definition is that it is the direct detection of chemical composition, usually through contact with the tongue. The tongue is the muscle that has different nerves on it that relay information to the brain, via the nervous system. This information is put back together and depending on your likes and dislikes, you either spit the food out or keep eating.

Brandt 4
The tongue is covered with chemoreceptor cells that detect the chemical composition of foods or



Bibliography: 1) Encyclopedia Brittanica (2002). Sensory Reception. Encyclopedia Brittanica(Vol. 27, pp. 164-220). USA: Encyclopedia Brittanica. 2) Encyclopedia Brittanica (2002). Nerves and Nervous System. Encyclopedia Brittanica(Vol. 24, pp. 785-860). USA: Encyclopedia Brittanica. 3) Hodgson, E.S. (2000). Taste. Encyclopedia Americana(Vol. 26 pp. 309) USA: Grolier 4) Chandler, J.R. (2000). Tongue. Encyclopedia Americana(Vol. 26 pp. 838) USA: Grolier 5) Encyclopedia Americana (2000). Smell. Encyclopedia Americana(Vol. 25 pp. 50) USA: Grolier 6) Karlson, B.M. (2000). Nose. Encyclopedia Americana(Vol. 20 pp. 482-485) USA: Grolier

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Satisfactory Essays

    Anatomy

    • 288 Words
    • 2 Pages

    * ofalction - the sense of smell, it involves olfactory receptors in paited olfactory organs responding to chemical stimuli…

    • 288 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    As I read the report it explained that the sensory system’s is so quick that one is unaware of its environmental stimuli are encoding for intensity and quality by…

    • 1119 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Sensory Perception

    • 773 Words
    • 3 Pages

    The paper will discuss sensory perception that asks the question can you really trust your senses and the interpretation of sensory data to give you an accurate view of the world. What are the accuracy and the weaknesses of the human senses as they pertain to thinking in general and to your own thinking in particular?…

    • 773 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    Taste and Smell Lab

    • 2037 Words
    • 9 Pages

    Taste and smell are examples of chemoreception, in which specific chemical compounds are detected by the sense organs and interpreted by various regions of the brain. (Wise, 2012) In this lab, we tested taste determination of solid materials-whether a person can taste a solid substance placed in the middle of their tongue when it is dry. It is unlikely that a person can taste the substance as it does not touch the taste receptors on the sides of the tongue.…

    • 2037 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Term Paper

    • 1304 Words
    • 6 Pages

    This is an upper level undergraduate course which is intended to present the fundamental biological principles of psychobiology/behavioral neuroscience to science undergraduate students. This course will cover the concepts of cellular and structural anatomy and physiology of the nervous system; the neurotransmitter systems and psychopharmacology; the functional anatomy of sensory systems, including vision, audition, olfaction, gustation and somatosensattion; and the motor system.…

    • 1304 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    Sensory Perceptions

    • 921 Words
    • 4 Pages

    If fortunate enough, most people are able to sense the world around them through all five senses; sight, sound, smell, taste, and touch. The information from these senses is paired with thoughts and memories from each experience, which the brain uses to tell individuals how to perceive input from the outside world. The following information will cover reasons for believing in the accuracy of sensory information, the contributing factors to accurate sensory data, and the role of nature versus nurture with regard to the interpretation and evaluation of sensory data.…

    • 921 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Tastes experiences come from our taste receptors. These make us sensitive to a range of taste qualities.…

    • 764 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Taste and smell share similar pathways to the brain and are influenced by the same stimuli. Both taste buds and olfactory bulbs are in a group of receptors known as chemoreceptors in the case of smell it’s the aromatic gases that trigger a response. In taste, it’s the mixture of chemicals with saliva in the mouth that trigger a response.…

    • 1910 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Ap Psychology Chapter 4

    • 4676 Words
    • 19 Pages

    The nervous system is the pathway for the instructions that permit our bodies to carry out everyday activities such as scratching an itch as well as more remarkable skills like climbing to the top of Mount Everest. Here we will look at the structure and function of neurons, the cells that make up the nervous system, including the brain.…

    • 4676 Words
    • 19 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    The somatosensory would be decipher the constancy of the object in the mouth. Whether it be firm like a fruit or mushy like mashed potatoes. The insula plays the primary role in taste. The insula is the primary taste cortex and that is where the sweet or salty flavor is decided. Small also plays a factor in taste and smell is deciphered in the cerebral cortex. (University of Phoenix,…

    • 974 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    □ Molecules are tasted by taste buds which are located in papillae on the tongue; each taste bud has an opening…

    • 7457 Words
    • 30 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Taste Bud and Sugar Water

    • 830 Words
    • 4 Pages

    "Sweet, Sour, Salt, Savoury, Bitter AND Fat: Scientists Discover That Tongue Has 'sixth Sense ' for Lipids." Mail Online. N.p., n.d. Web. 05 Apr. 2013. <http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2086949/Sweet-sour-salt-savoury-bitter-AND-fat-Scientists-discover-tongue-sixth-sense-lipids.html>.…

    • 830 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    From the human anatomy perspective we will study the nervous system and the structure of the brain, identify its different lobes and cortices, and analyze various tissues and organ systems within CNS in accordance to their functional and regional contexts.. You will learn about neuron development and plasticity, neurobiological systems, such as the sensory and motor systems, and the neural mechanisms of such complex phenomena, as memory, cognition, and emotions.…

    • 926 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Tma2

    • 846 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Our knowledge of the human body has grown and psychology itself has become an expanding field of knowledge, various research and studies have been carried out on the brain. The most well-known of the brain cells are the neurons, the human brain contains around 10, billion neurons. Neurons are not like every other type of cell found in the human body, they do not usually reproduce themselves, in every other organ of the human body there is a continual turnover of cells, some very rapidly replace in hours. The function of the neuron is to transmit impulses from their origin to their destination i.e. to the muscle that controls movements of the legs and cardiac function. The nerve fibres of a neuron are not actually joined together but have a minute gap called synapse and this transmit from one neuron to another and again to the central nervous system which is the main communication system of the body it receives and interpret information from both inside and outside of the body. The nervous system has two main divisions:…

    • 846 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Taste Buds

    • 1001 Words
    • 5 Pages

    The sense of taste is mediated by taste receptor cells which are bundled in clusters called taste buds. Taste receptor cells sample oral concentrations of a large number of small molecules and report a sensation of taste to centers in the brainstem.…

    • 1001 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays