The Feminine Mystique

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In Feminine Mystique, Betty Friedan wrote about women's inequality from men to women's equality to men, women accepting the inequality to women fighting for equality.
Feminine Mystique, is trying to encourage the reader to what occurred during the feminist movement. How women's rights came to a reality, how women believed there was only one role to have which is a typical housewife that has a husband to overpower her. Not being able to vote, or have any rights as an equal to men. Friedan also defines the "feminine mystique" as the sharp awareness of the expectations of women and how each woman has to fit a certain role as a little girl, an ignorant and jobless teenager, and finally as a wife and mother who are to happily cleans the kitchen and take care of the household all day every day. After World War II, a lot of women's organizations began to appear with the goal of bringing the issues of equal rights into the limelight.
The stereotype even came down to the color of a woman's hair. Many women wished that they could be blonde because that was the ideal hair color.
In The Feminine Mystique, Friedan writes that "across America, three out of every ten women dyed their hair blonde”. This helps as an example of how there was such a push for women to fit a certain mold which was described as the role of women. Blacks were naturally omitted from the notion of ideal women and they suffered extra discrimination which was even bigger than that which the white women suffered from.
In addition to hair color, women often went to great lengths to achieve a thin

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