The Falling Man

Good Essays
26/09/11
The Falling Man
The Falling Man is a photograph of a man who is falling from the North tower of the World Trade Center during the crisis of the 11th September, taken by a photographer called Richard Drew. This picture in particularly was chosen to appear in the newspapers of the world, it was seen only once in the New York Times but was then removed due too much criticism. This photo caused a lot of arguments in terms of the U.S. newspaper industries; this was because of the way the people reacted to it. There 2 main reactions on one side, it was taken as symbol or a main event that described what happened that day, it was also interpreted as an example of accepting one fate. One the other hand some people fully disagreed with the publishing of such a picture; they took it more as offense and mockery towards all those who died that day.
The aim of that picture was neither to offend the American people nor to strike fear in them, but on the contrary to show something that had to be seen. It sort of a reminder of difficult choices that we as humans have to make in our life, in the case of the Falling Man he had the choice between having a slow and painful death by the fire or jumping and instantly die on impact. In the picture we see that he chose to jump, and the body language that we can read at that specific moment tells that he is fully aware of his choice and he accepts it. In some cases it can be understood why people don’t really appreciate this image, for some people they feel as if it is newspapers who just want to sell. For them the 11th September was a dark day that should not be toyed with, and instead respect should be shown to those who perished in the disaster.
The Falling Man is an image that must be shown maybe not to everyone, but it should not be forgotten. Because it is an image of a truth that cannot be ignored; there are things that can be very dangerous in this world, small threats that can become great menaces. This image is a

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    The Falling Man

    • 294 Words
    • 2 Pages

    “The Falling Man” Looking at this picture, emotions rush through your body making you remember the terrible event that happened on Tuesday, September 11, 2001. The story behind this picture has to do with the most horrific day in history; the day terrorists crashed two planes in the towers of the World Trade Center. Fifteen seconds past 9:41 a.m. on September 11, 2001, Richard Drew took the picture of the now world known famous, “The Falling Man.” He jumped head first, like an arrow shooting…

    • 294 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Falling Man

    • 741 Words
    • 3 Pages

    10 Nov. 2012 Analyzing Sarah stein’s “The ‘1984’ Macintosh Ad: Cinematic Icons and Constitutive Rhetoric in the Launch of a New Machine”. In 2002 the rhetorical analysis of the “1984” Macintosh ad was published by Sarah Stein. Sarah Stein’s “The ‘1984’ Macintosh Ad: Cinematic Icons and Constitutive Rhetoric in the Launch of a New Machine” Explores the dimensions of the “1984” Macintosh ad, which features a big brother theme taken from the dystopic George Orwell novel, allusions to the Wizard…

    • 741 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Falling Man Delillo

    • 1797 Words
    • 8 Pages

    deaths of over 3,000 innocent people (9/11). The aftermath and the coping of the citizens of New York City set as the backdrop of the novel, Falling Man written by Don DeLillo. As a native New Yorker, DeLillo has made references to the World Trade Centres in his previously written novels such as Americana, Player, Mao II, and Underworld (Conte 562). Falling Man introduces the reader to the family of Keith Glenn, a survivor of the World Trade Centres, Lianne Glenn, spouse of Keith, and their son, Justin…

    • 1797 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Falling Man Analysis

    • 1289 Words
    • 3 Pages

    became graceful sacred angels returning to their source. “Falling Man” is an article focusing on the identity of one of these jumpers depicted in a well-known photograph taken by Richard Drew. The article is composed of numerous rhetorical devices that eventually give way to the author’s arguments towards the photograph. Utilization of rhetoric in the article allows a better understanding of the writer and its intended audience. The search for the man who fell seeming to embrace his fate in the article…

    • 1289 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    9/11 Falling Man

    • 543 Words
    • 3 Pages

    death. Many believe that these “jumpers” were put to the test. “The Falling Man” was one of the many workers that did not anticipate their end to come. But this particular ‘jumper’ was very different from all the others. The man was identified as a slightly dark-skinned, tall person wearing a uniform that most chefs and pastry workers wore- along with a noticeable bright orange shirt underneath. His stance as he was falling was one of the things many people noticed that was very unique. His body…

    • 543 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    people jumping out of the building as they were collapsing. Tom Junod, a writer for the Esquire magazine, illustrates his perspective of this shocking incident through pictures, media coverage, and depicting people’s reactions in his article The Falling Man. Tom Junod’s article should be read by anyone who believes they have felt all there is to feel from the 9/11 attack. He will prove otherwise that there is indeed still much emotion to be felt even 10 years after the happenings of that day. Tom Junod…

    • 1490 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Through the exploration of the texts Maestro, by Peter Goldsworthy, and The Falling Man, by Richard Drew, the emergence of imagery deciphers and projects the varying meanings of each text. Through distinctively visual language features in the novel Maestro, images are created which help convey the major theme of the text; relationships. This is contrasted by the visual techniques in the image of The Falling Man, capturing a moment of terror in history. Both texts similarly consist of the raw…

    • 588 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Conte in “Don DeLillo’s Falling Man and the Age of Terror” notes, “DeLillo repeatedly invoked the World Trade Center as representative of the gigantism and hubris of global capitalism, a force that he stridently resisted from the start of his carrier in Americana, in which the television executive David Bell, abandons his unfulfilling job in New York City” (562). Falling Man exposes DeLillo’s transnational political investigation through its fictional…

    • 1059 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Falling in Love

    • 594 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Falling in Love “Hey, hellooo, man what is wrong with you? You have been acting strange lately and I think it has something to do with you falling in love.” Nicole said. “Yea, falling in love has some weird effects on me.” Kendall responded. The two girls continue to chatter about the effects of falling in love. Falling in love can have a variety of devastating and enjoyable effects such as always have a companion, getting…

    • 594 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Falling Down

    • 402 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Falling Down Urban areas of the world have always been a crucial element in spatial organization and the evolution of societies. Towns and cities are centers of cultural innovation social transformation and political change. They can also be engines of economic development. The gross domestic product of large cities like Los Angeles is roughly equivalent to that of entire countries like Australia and Sweden. Towns and cities are essential elements in human economic and social organization…

    • 402 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays