The Exegesis of Exodus 21:1-11

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The Exegesis of Exodus 21:1-11

The Law concerning Slaves
1These are the ordinances that you shall set before them:
2When you buy a male Hebrew slave, he shall serve six years, but in the seventh he shall go out a free person, without debt.3If he comes in single, he shall go out single; if he comes in married, then his wife shall go out with him.4If his master gives him a wife and she bears him sons or daughters, the wife and her children shall be her master 's and he shall go out alone.5But if the slave declares, "I love my master, my wife, and my children; I will not go out a free person,"6then his master shall bring him before God. He shall be brought to the door or the doorpost; and his master shall pierce his ear with an awl; and he shall serve him for life.
7When a man sells his daughter as a slave, she shall not go out as the male slaves do.8If she does not please her master, who designated her for himself, then he shall let her be redeemed; he shall have no right to sell her to a foreign people, since he has dealt unfairly with her.9If he designates her for his son, he shall deal with her as with a daughter.10If he takes another wife to himself, he shall not diminish the food, clothing, or marital rights of the first wife.11And if he does not do these three things for her, she shall go out without debt, without payment of money.

Exodus begins in Egypt where the people of God have been living in slavery to Pharaoh. God called for the people of Israel to get up and leave their position of slavery in Egypt when they had been crying out to God for deliverance. He was concerned about their suffering and he rescued them.As God delivers the Israelites and God also directed the people through the godly leadership of Moses, they move into the desert by way of the Red Sea and eventually come to Mount Sinai in the Sinai Peninsula. God rescues and delivers his people as he guides them into the unfamiliar desert. There God institutes his system of laws, gives



Bibliography: American Commentary (474). Nashville: Broadman & Holman Publishers. Biblical Studies Press. (2006; 2006). The NET Bible First Edition Notes(Ex 21:11). Biblical Studies Press. Bromiley, G.W., ed. International Standard Bible Encyclopedia. 4 vols. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1979-1988. Stuart, D. K. (2007). Vol. 2: Exodus(electronic ed.). Logos Library System; The New American Commentary (474). Nashville: Broadman & Holman Publishers. Walvoord, J. F., Zuck, R. B., & Dallas Theological Seminary. (1983-). The Bible knowledge commentary : An exposition of the scriptures (Ex 21:7–11). Wheaton, IL: Victor Books. ----------------------- 1

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