The Ethnographic Films

Good Essays
We all watch films, and documentaries. Generally, we learn some things from them, but can we be sure what we learned is true, and objective? If the films compare and analyze the context (religion, language, etc.) well, we call these kinds of films as ‘ethnographic’ films. A simple question can be appeared in our minds: which films are the ethnographic films? We will try to find an answer to this question with discussing the intentions, the wholeness and the ethics of ethnographic film-making.

The films (or documentaries) are not naïve as we think. To find the reasons for making a film, we should ask questions such as ‘Why was the film made?’ ‘Who was it made for?’ and ‘what can it be used for?’. If we do not recognize that the film is objective or not, then we can learn wrong things, and have wrong thoughts about what we watched. For example, we watched a film about some Americans who is under attack by natives in a town, and they kill those native people to survive. After watching this film, we directly think that the native people are dangerous, aggressive, and must be killed, but if we just watched a part of this fight with the viewpoint of an American? If the intention of this film is to make us think bad about natives? We cannot know, we must watch the whole fight between natives and Americans with whole person, and whole viewpoint of both of them.

The word ‘wholeness’ has an important meaning for ethnographic films. Because the films are getting closer to the reality and becoming obvious if we use the whole context. I want to give an example again: we are making a film with the ways of recording and translating the beliefs and tradition of human cultures and we are cutting and editing the events. Can the people who watch our film understand what they do exactly? I do not think so. Conversely, if we record the event as they happen with the essence of the people, their passion, their fears and their motivations, our film will be whole and

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    Ethnographic films have focused on one key component, reality. It is the goal of ethnographic filmmakers to do their best to try to, in their minds, to the best of their abilities, express that perfect representation of the real. According to Peter Loizos, real[ism] “appears as it does in real life” as if the camera is an unseen observer; “Realism is life as it is lived and observed” (Loizos 165-66) and reveals the “whole bodies [...] whole people [...] whole life” (Loizos 7). That reality can only…

    • 781 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    While writing allows single out a common thread to many events, a film is bound to display the unique moments captured by the camera. To miss out on certain occurrences, due to technical issues linked with the use of a camera, reduces the possibility of being objective through film, as all aspects of social reality may not be presented. In order to address this problem, certain producers have distorted reality, thus not creating a simple account of fieldwork experience. Particularly, Nanook of the…

    • 1469 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Critical Ethnographic Film Review Zapatista Zapatista, a film by Benjamin Eichert, Rick Rowley, and Staale Sandberg is based in the most southern state in Mexico, Chiapas. This films depicts indigenous people in Chiapas fighting for visibility and recognition against their country and government. When the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) was signed in to law, on January first 1994, the Zapatista National Liberation Movement (EZLN) rose up and seized several cities in Chiapas to fight…

    • 1048 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    interactional points). This mode was for the most part utilized as a part of ethnographic film and in social hypotheses of participatory examination, and presents the relationship between the movie producer and the recorded subject. The executive turns into an agent and enters obscure domain, takes an interest in the lives of others, and increases coordinate and inside and out understanding and reflection from the film. This method of representation is available in movies, for example, Celovek kinoapparatom…

    • 214 Words
    • 1 Page
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Ethnographic Analysis

    • 625 Words
    • 3 Pages

    interpretation of ethnography is the study and analysis of people based on culture, history, and society. This definition is loosely based off the interpretation by Tim Ingold in his piece That’s enough about ethnography. Yet. From my experience reading ethnographic pieces, it appears that ethnography is far more than a study but also defines the experiences and process of the ethnographer capturing and portraying a social space. A world, through the eyes of a scholar, lends to, “a judgment that is cast upon…

    • 625 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Ethnographic Research

    • 651 Words
    • 3 Pages

    ETHNOGRAPHIC RESEARCH Ethnographic research: Overview Ethnography studies cultures, subcultures through close observation and interpretation. In the process of ethnographic research, the phenomenon is being observed by direct involvement of the researcher, finding ways and methods to take part in people 's lives in order to be close to the cultural context. In this sense, ethnographic research has collaborative nature because the project would not be possible to realize without the targeted members…

    • 651 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Ethnographic Reseacrh

    • 734 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Ethnographic Research Ethnography is a type of social science research that investigates the practices and life of a community, by becoming one of its members. It is based on learning about a context and the people living in it, by understanding their values, needs and vocabulary. It requires faithful reporting of what is experienced or observed, avoiding any interpretation or evaluation as far as possible. Within the field of experience design, ethnography or video ethnography are methods used…

    • 734 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Ethnographic Research

    • 4245 Words
    • 17 Pages

    importance of context to ethnographic inquiry. In the final part of the chapter, I shall highlight some of the 'central concerns of this topic by contrasting psychometry and ethnography, The chapter seeks to address the following questions: • - What do we mean by ethnography? • - What are the key principles guiding ethnographic research? • - How might one deal with threats to the reliability and validity of this type of research? • - Why is context important to ethnographic research? • - In what ways…

    • 4245 Words
    • 17 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Ethnographic Essay

    • 2073 Words
    • 9 Pages

    The problem of gaining access can provide important insights into the nature and organization of the social setting under study. In what ways can issues influence the outcome of ethnographic research? What strategies can researchers adopt to overcome obstacles to access? ‘Ethnography is branch of anthropology which has aided social researchers in the quest for a deeper understanding of different societies, social groups or cultures’ (Hammersely, 1995p365). The purpose this essay is to gain…

    • 2073 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    Ethnographic Interview

    • 1510 Words
    • 7 Pages

    Ethnographic Interview: Taiwan Culture Experience 1 Ethnographic Interview: Taiwan Culture Experience Vntge Jayne Clark Atlanta University Communication Cultural Diversity, Professor Howell March 14, 2011 2 PRECONCEPTIONS Culture is defined as the traditions, customs, norms, beliefs, values and thought patterning passed down from generation to generation (Jandt 2010). The world consists of many different cultures. In…

    • 1510 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Better Essays