the essay

Topics: Sistine Chapel ceiling, Sistine Chapel, Mary Pages: 1 (408 words) Published: April 15, 2014
 honoring the Virgin Mary, and even look for bombs on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel. Although the sikh does not share these people's faith, he does everything he can to protect it.

Hana and Caravaggio talk. She tells him that she was pregnant and used to talk to the baby all the time, but lost the baby in an abortion when she got to Sicily, as the baby's father was dead anyway. Hana tells Caravaggio all she has learned about death in her work as a nurse. She tells him that, after a while, she refused to have anything to do with the soldiers on a personal level. She withdrew emotionally and threw herself into her work.

The sikh, named Kip, goes into the English patient's room to talk to him one day. It turns out that they get along very well, and they are able to spend much time talking of their expertise on bombs, guns, and weapons. Hana is glad that her patient has found a new friend.Hana is a twenty year old Canadian Army nurse. Hana is torn between her youth and her maturity. In a sense, she has lost her childhood too early. Hana, being a good nurse, quickly learns that she can not become emotionally attached to her patients. She calls them all "buddy," and immediately detaches from them once they die. Her lover, a Canadian officer, is killed. It is because of this that Hana comes to believe that she is cursed and that all of those around her are doomed to die.

In contrast to this detachment, upon hearing of her father's death Hana has an emotional breakdown. She then puts all of her energy into caring for the English Patient. She washes his wounds and provides him with morphine. When the hospital is abandoned, Hana refuses to leave and instead stays with her patient. She sees Almásy as saintlike and falls in love with his pure nature.

The character of Hana is entirely paradoxical. She is mature beyond her years, but she still clings to childlike practices. She plays hopscotch in the villa and sees the English Patient as a noble hero who is...
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