The Effects of Cochlear Implants on Musical Perception in Hearing-Impaired Individuals

Better Essays
The Effects of Cochlear Implants on Musical Perception in Hearing-Impaired Individuals
Communication Deviations and Disorders
March 5, 2013

There are many effects that cochlear implants have on individuals with impaired hearing. Music is a major aspect of hearing that is affected by the presence of a cochlear implant in these individuals. Characteristics like pitch, rhythm and meter, melodic contour, and timbre are those that most affect the perception of music in those who have cochlear implants. By understanding the differences in musical perception caused by having cochlear implants, researchers can develop technology that will greatly advance the hearing quality of these listeners. This could certainly lead to improvement in speech perception in hearing-impaired individuals.

Previous studies have found that pitch perception is the most difficult aspect of music to distinguish for individuals with cochlear implants (CIs). Pitch is the highness or lowness of a sound. It is described as the perceived frequency of complex tones that is heard by the human ear (Drennan and Rubinstein, 2008). Pitch is also known as the rate of vibrations of a sine wave that travel through the air per second, and it is expressed in Hertz (Hz).

The temporal coding theory states that the repetition rate of a pitch relies on the complexity of the tone. These repetitions that average up to 2,000 Hz correspond to locations on the basilar membrane in the cochlea in normal hearing individuals. In CI listeners, the average pitch repetition does not extend above 300 Hz. This limit of 300 Hz corresponds to the middle-C note on the piano, which implies that it would be more difficult to perceive pitches with a fundamental frequency higher than that note (Looi, McDermott, McKay, and Hickson, 2008). Because of the limited range of frequencies that can be heard clearly in users with CIs, musical perception is skewed. This muddles songs that are composed of complex melodies and



References: Cooper, W. B., Tobey, E., & Loizou, P. C. (2008). Music perception by cochlear implant and normal hearing listeners as measured by the Montréal battery for evaluation of Amusia. Ear and Hearing, 29(4), 618. Drennan, W. R., & Rubinstein, J. T. (2008). Music perception in cochlear implant users and its relationship with psychophysical capabilities. Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development, 45(5), 779. Galvin, J. J. I., - Fu, Q., & - Nogaki, G. – Melodic contour identification by cochlear implant listeners. Ear and Hearing, 28(3), 302. Looi, V., McDermott, H., McKay, C., & Hickson, L. (2008). Music perception of cochlear implant users compared with that of hearing aid users. Ear and Hearing, 29(3), 421-434. Vongpaisal, T., Trehub, S. E., & Schellenberg, E. G. (2006). Song recognition by children and adolescents with cochlear implants. Journal of Speech, Language & Hearing Research, 49(5), 1091-1103. doi: 10.4044/1092-4388(2006/078)

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    Cochlear Implants Effects

    • 487 Words
    • 2 Pages

    These individuals, while low in percentage, are hearing impaired, or also known as deaf. Until recently, people hard of hearing did not have a chance to restore their lost sense. However, as technology has advanced, small electronic devices called cochlear implants have been created to provide stimulation to the auditory nerve within the inner ear, thus providing people with a perception of the sense of sound. While this machinery is an innovative step towards the restoration of hearing, limitations…

    • 487 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Cochlear Implant

    • 462 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Description of Aid A cochlear implant is an artificial hearing device, also called the Bionic Ear. It uses an external microphone and a speech processor to stimulate the auditory nerve through embedded electrodes in the cochlea. The technology helps hearing impaired people who are profoundly deaf and/or have damage to the inner ear or auditory nerve. Position and Type of Energy Transfer Occurring In terms of the position and type of energy transfer occurring, cochlear implants were developed to bypass…

    • 462 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Cochlear Implants

    • 1118 Words
    • 5 Pages

    What influences the success rate of cochlear implants? Introduction Human beings have been gifted with five basic senses those of touch, sound, smell, sight and taste. Hearing is one of the very essential and treasured senses; any disruption causes us immense concern. However, some of us are most unfortunate to get affected by loss of hearing. The ear is divided into 3 parts (anatomically) as the Outer, Middle and Inner parts. “The cochlea is the auditory portion of the inner ear. Its core component…

    • 1118 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Cochlear Implant

    • 676 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Cochlear Implant Australian innovation By Year 11 Dnt What is a cochlear implant? A cochlear implant is a medical device that is placed into the head behins the ear of a deaf person. When it is used with a microphone and speech processor it stimulates the auditory nerve allowing the person to hear. Many people with hearing loss can use hearing aids to help them hear but people with severe hearing loss or deaf hearing aids don’t work. These people may use the cochlear implant The cochlear…

    • 676 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Cochlear Implants

    • 658 Words
    • 3 Pages

    to determine if they have a hearing loss. Some children are identified early in infancy to detect a hearing loss while other children are identified when they are a little older. After being identified as having a hearing loss, the parents of the infant or child must make important life changing decisions for the child. A cochlear implant is one of the options a parents has for their child which is a controversial procedure among the deaf and hard of hearing people in the United States.…

    • 658 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Cochlear Implants

    • 771 Words
    • 4 Pages

    people worldwide and of all ages have benefited from life-changing cochlear implant technology (Humadro 46). Carrick has received backlash by the Deaf—people who embraces cultural norms, beliefs, and values of the Deaf Community—because of his decision to treat his case of deafness as a medical condition that needs to be modified. Parents of infant cochlear recipients are scrutinized for their adjudication. Children with profound hearing loss should be allowed to receive…

    • 771 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Cochlear Implants

    • 577 Words
    • 2 Pages

    For people needing cochlear implants, there is not a viable substitute that can serve as a replacement for cochlear implants. One technology that is similar to cochlear implants is hearing aids. Hearing aids consists of a battery, a microphone, an amplifier, and a receiver or speaker. The battery provides power to the hearing aid and the microphone picks up sound from the surrounding environment and converts the sound into an electrical signal. This signal is then sent to the amplifier. The amplifier…

    • 577 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    the 1900s the first electric hearing aid was invented by a viennese man named Dr. Frederick Alt. One hearing aid was the ear trumpet. Other inventions included snail-shaped with shells, wire spring ran over the top of the head. Many scientists developed hearing aids that the teeth to conduct sound. In the twentieth century hearing aids became smaller and more sophisticated. In the 1932, the Royal Residential School teachers wore microphone and each child wore hearing aids. Most schools forbidden…

    • 1376 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Hearing Impaired

    • 2479 Words
    • 10 Pages

    Hearing is one of the major senses and like vision is important for distant warning and communication. It can be used to alert, to communicate pleasure and fear. It is a conscious appreciation of vibration perceived as sound. In order to do this, the appropriate signal must reach the higher parts of the brain. Hearing impairment - A reduction in the ability to perceive sound; may range from slight inability to complete deafness HI- it is a distinction between deaf and hard of hearing. Deaf…

    • 2479 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Essay On Cochlear Implants

    • 1305 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Cochlear implants are a form of hearing loss treatment that can be used for people who do not benefit from hearing aids. The implantation of the device is a surgical technique. Cochlear implants do not restore normal hearing but can significantly improve ability to hear sounds and interact with the environment. Recipients can hear speech, telephones, and may be able to listen and enjoy music. The surgical procedure is outpatient and takes only a couple hours. After the surgical site heals, the auditory…

    • 1305 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays