The effectiveness of the UDHR

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The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) is effective to an extent with regards to promoting human rights which all people are entitled to and enforeability. Human rights are known as a series of the basic rights and freedoms incorporated into a body of international law in which states accept it as a prerequisite for people’s enjoyment of a life based on human dignity. Human rights are said to follow four conditions that are in being Universal (applying to everyone), indivisible (equally important), inherent (belong to all everyone on the basis of being human) and inalienable (can’t be taken away). Human rights are achievable through the following of United Nation’s UDHR in which the UDHR creates a standard for member states to adhere to and ratify into their domestic law to ensure the basic rights of individuals are upheld and respected.

The declaration of human rights is highly effective as it recognises the worth of all persons ignoring a basis consisting of discrimination on any grounds and follows the fundamental freedoms of religious, cultural and ideological factors the member states may have held prior to and during the incorporation of the UDHR. The UDHR was the basis for the creation of many covenants such as the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR). This sparked further influence in the recognition of minorities in countries not only relating to small religious groups within a state or country but also in minority or powerless groups such as the rights of children(1959) and people with disabilities(1975).

The UDHR is however not applicable to member states unless ratified therefore making it unenforceable. The UDHR is not enforceable by law if the country at hand are not a part of the United Nations. So, in a case where a Catholic Australian woman may travel overseas to a country such as Iran, (where they do not follow the UDHR), her right to freely practice her religion or wear what she pleases will be taken away

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