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The effect of visual stimuli on heart rate

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The effect of visual stimuli on heart rate
The Effect of Visual Stimuli on Heart Rate
HL Biology
James Kosiol
Focus Question
What is the effect of a timed visual stimuli (45 seconds), in the form of flashing coloured lights (White 0/s (control), White and Black 1/s, Blue 2/s, Red 3/s, Green 4/s and Multicoloured 5/s) on the heart rate of the viewer?

Table of Contents

1.Design 1.1 Defining the Problem
Focus Question
What is the effect of a timed visual stimuli (45 seconds), in the form of flashing coloured lights (White 0/s (control), White and Black 1/s, Blue 2/s, Red 3/s, Green 4/s and Multicoloured 5/s) on the effect of the fight or flight response measured by the heart rate of the viewer?
Hypothesis
If the speed and the colour brightness of the light is increased, then the heart rate of the viewer will be increased. The highest heart rate measured will be from the multicoloured stimulus and the lowest will be at the black and white stimulus. (Due to the visual stimuli causing different amounts of adrenaline being released from the adrenal glands, referred to as the ‘flight or flight’ response)
Background Information/Theory
The Heart is a vital organ within the human body (C.J.Clegg). Its main purpose within the human body is to pump blood through the entire human body (Seymour, 2007). Blood contains white and red blood cells, which the human body uses for different reasons (Seymour, 2007). As the heart is quiet a small organ in relation to the body size, it would be difficult for just the heart to pump all the blood around the body, but, within many different places within the human body, there are smaller organs called pulses which helps push the blood through the veins (Seymour, 2007). These pulses are completely in sync with the heart, beating at the same rate at which the heart does (Seymour, 2007). The Pulses are in some locations (specifically the wrist) where they are very close to the skin, thus enabling a measurement of the heart rate to be possible

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