The Count of Monte Cristo

Topics: The Count of Monte Cristo, Alexandre Dumas, père, Stephen King Pages: 4 (1455 words) Published: September 8, 2013
Garret M. Gwozdz
Ms. Vertiz
English I-H./4
28 March 2013
The Mad Twins
The Count of Monte Cristo, written by Alexandre dumas in 1845, has fascinated and intrigued readers for centuries, with its numerous gothic elements and motifs. It was written in France during the time after Napoleon was dethroned in 1844. Alexandre Dumas took a tour of Southern France in 1834 and much of the information that he gained on the tour was used to write this novel including the City of Marseille. The novel, with its complex and diverse range of characters and their relations, is littered with gothic references, motifs, and symbols. Three particular motifs that Dumas repeatedly used throughout the plot are the Faust, and doppelgangers to show that Dantés believes he is powerful enough to manipulate and control other people, and he Dumas also uses a magic talisman to show the transition Edmond makes from a naïve seaman to a master manipulator. One motif found most often in The Count of Monte Cristo is the Faust. After Dantés escapes prison he truly believes that he is capable of anything and that no one can stop him. Renée Winegarten says that “The Count of Monte Cristo, himself, has a fabulous inexhaustible amount of wealth and the immense power it gives him,” (Winegarten 13). Edmond Dantés manipulates people’s destinies almost as if he has a right to do so. He plays with their lives like puppets and they mostly respond exactly how he planned it, with few exceptions. On the topic of power, Franz says this to the count:

But, with such an outlook, that makes you the judge and executioner in your own case, it would be hard for you to confine yourself to actions that would leave you forever immune to the power of the law. Hatred is blind and anger deaf: the one who pours himself a cup of vengeance is likely to drink a bitter draught. (Dumas 444) But, with such an outlook, that makes you the judge and executioner in your own case, it would be hard for you to confine yourself to...

Cited: Dumas, Alexandre. The Count of Monte Cristo. New York: Random House, 1996. Print.
Winegarten, Renné. Alexandre Dumas: Fact and Fiction. Detroit: Gale, 2003. Print.
Brustein, Robert. The Naked and the Dressed. Detroit: Gale, 2003. Print
Williams, A.N. “Cerebrovascular disease in Dumas’ The Count of Monte Cristo” National
Center of Biotechnology information (2003): Web.
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