The Contempt In Marianne Moore's Poetry

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In Marianne Moore’s poem, “Poetry”, the author tells the events of developing and learning that poetry is truly something very special. This is evident from the selection of words in this piece of writing, which include contempt, discovers, and genuine. They occur in the poem in this order, which the author does for a reason. The author does this to show that through the duration of the story, the author changes and grows to see the greatness in poetry. At the beginning, the author does not like poetry, having contempt for such work, but as time goes on she discovers there is more to poetry than she once believed, and then she finally grasps the genuine nature of poetry, thus accepting its greatness. Contempt is the first word that sticks out in “Poetry.” At the beginning of the poem, the author shows contempt towards poetry. She had no respect for this type of writing because she saw it as being useless and full of nonsense. She may have felt this way about poetry because she had not evaluated it on her own. Her views may have been a result of what she had heard of poetry and her preconceived notion of what poetry was. Many people have an assumption that poetry is boring and rudimentary. …show more content…
Through her exploration of poetry, she discovered that it was different than what she originally thought. It really was not as bad as what people made it out to be. It was actually something worth reading. She essentially realized that poetry is something that one must discover before they can truly make a judgement of how they feel about it. Poetry is not something for everyone, but those who do love poetry must discover before they truly know of how great it is. Even with this, most people who have read poetry appreciate it. It is very different from other forms of writing, but it will still always tell a

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