The Condemnation of Blackness

Powerful Essays
The Roots and Deceived Perception of Racism in the History of America America is a nation “from many, one” as stated in our country’s original motto. We pride ourselves on the granted equal opportunity and freedom afforded to each citizen. But are these premises held true and adequately carried out? My answer is a resounding no! Our country’s intricate history provides us with the foundation that explains why and how discrimination has infiltrated and given the upper hand to the white race that has dominated the American society, while suppressing races of color. Dating back to the discovery of the new world we know as the contemporary United States, the African American race has been segregated and mistreated as exemplified through slavery, falsely relayed “scientifically findings,” and the detrimental habit of forming stereotypical judgements. This has affected African American’s ability to flourish and homogenize into in the diverse culture of the United States. Throughout this writing, I will focus on the late nineteenth century racial discrimination issues, and how they were created, through the eyes of many influential sociologists that had a firsthand look at this period of ethic divide. Citizens of the colonial era encompassed an attitude of automatic entitlement and superiority due to their perceived advanced societies. Their abundant use and cruelty to African American slaves is the stem of the sectarian activity that swept across America for hundreds of years to follow. Slavery created a direct path for abuse and lack of opportunity for African Americans as soon as they stepped onto American soil. As a result, blacks were forced into manual labor with death as the ultimate consequence if they tried to resist. Slavery gave the entire black race the stigma of inferiority and unworthiness of freedom. This social norm of the time, was widely accepted, and only supported the superior attitude of White America. In years to follow, several active


Cited: The Color of Courage. Dir. Lee Rose. Perf. Linda Hamilton, Lynn Whitfield and Bruce Greenwood. 1999. Tv Film. Harris, Cheryl L. "Whiteness as Property." Harvard Law Review 8th ser. 106.June 1993 (1993): n. pag. Print. Lipsitz, George. How Racism Takes Place. Philadelphia: Temple UP, 2011. Print. Muhammad, Khalil Gibran. The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America. Cambridge: Harvard UP, 2011. Print. Takaki, Ronald T. A Different Mirror: A History of Multicultural America. Boston: Little, Brown &, 1993. Print. Unchained Memories: Readings from the Slave Narratives. Dir. Ed Bell. Perf. Whoopi Goldberg, Angela Basset and Michael Boatman. 2003. DVD.

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