The Civil Rights Act of 1964

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THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964

I was not born until after Martin Luther King had died. Born in 1968, I didn't know African Americans were treated as second class citizens. The Civil Rights Movement was ongoing and the Civil Rights Act of 1964 was being enforced. Unlike my parents, aunts and grandparents, when I got older I only heard of the Civil Rights Movement and Act of 1964 in school, and did not know that I was reaping the benefits from it until I was old enough to understand. Unlike the generation before me, I didn't have to deal with laws that did not protect their individual's rights, resulting in them being discriminated against continuously, such as going to segregated schools and having segregated public places. As a small boy, I didn't know they were attempting to defy racial discrimination and segregation. Because of the marches, boycotts, protests and federal government enforcement to end racial inequality, we would not have the Civil Rights Act of 1964 today that allows blacks the right to vote, citizenship, education, and able to utilize public facilities. "Historical momentum for civil rights legislation picked up speed after 1945 as a result of black migration to northern cities and the experiences of black soldier in World War II. Bills introduced in Congress regarding employment policy brought the issue of civil rights to the attention of representatives and senators" (CongressLink, n.d.). Apparently the Fourteenth Amendment didn't protect black people from their civil rights that were being violated by individuals. This was a start for the civil rights movement, but in order to understand the Civil Rights Act you have to know the definition of civil rights. According to Cornell Law School: Wex "A civil right is an enforceable right or privilege, which if interfered with by another gives rise to an action for injury. Examples of civil rights are freedom of speech, press, assembly, the right to vote, freedom from

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