The Church and Moral Authority

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The Church as Moral Authority
The church acts as the moral authority to determine what is right and wrong based on certain circumstances. The official teaching of the church on these moral situations is called the magisterium. The magisterium consists of the bishops and the pope. In order to accomplish this mission to teach the faith the bishops will delegate and designate others to teach, or they will teach directly themselves. The bishops also give a teaching mission to theologians and to all those who speak in their name. Catholics believe that the church will be protected by these fundamental teachings and of course faith.
I have a mixed opinion on the church as being the moral authority. I do believe they have good standards, and the reason for their decisions is always for the good of everyone. But I also think the Catholic Church has lost its grasp on most of the modern world today. With so many different cultures and understandings, it is hard to keep the attention of so many with such strict rules.
Of the few people I asked they said they believe the church has the right to express their views as it is freedom of speech. But hey think that they are not keeping up with modern times. The Church needs to learn how to grow with the public. What worked 50 years ago will not work today.
The Church’s teaching on its role of moral authority is simple. The church shapes moral character, guards and maintains moral tradition, and is a community of moral deliberation whenever and wherever moral issues emerge. The purpose of the church today in modern times is to continue gathering and building communion through acts of love, outreach, sacraments, and through preaching.
“...assertion of a mistaken notion of autonomy of conscience, rejection of the Church's authority and her teaching, lack of conversion and of charity: these can be at the source of errors of judgment in moral conduct.” --Catechism
The Church is trying to say that if you do not follow the

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