The Catcher in the rye book review

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The Catcher in the rye, is one of the most successful and controversial works of Jerome David Salinger also known as J.D Salinger. He was an American writer who won acclaim early in life. Very private for more than a half-century thereon, he last published an original work in 1965 and gave his final interview in 1980. Raised in Manhattan, Salinger began writing short stories while in secondary school, and he had several published in Story magazine in the early 1940s before serving in World War II. In 1948, his critically acclaimed story "A Perfect Day for Bananafish" appeared in The New Yorker magazine, which became home to much of his later work. In 1951, his novel The Catcher in the Rye was an immediate popular success. The novel remains widely read and controversial, selling around 250, 000 copies a year. His depiction of adolescent alienation and loss of innocence in the protagonist Holden Caulfield, being the main idea, was influential especially among adolescent readers. Main character is Holden Caulfield, the 17 year old boy who planned on being a catcher in the rye. His intended audience are adolescents or students which this story mostly implies. Something unique and interesting in this book is that J.D Salinger wrote this novel through his own experiences, meaning this is almost the same one written in his autobiography during his teenage life. The success of the said novel led to public attention and scrutiny: Salinger became reclusive, publishing new work less frequently. He followed Catcher with a short story collection, Nine Stories (1953), a volume containing a novella and a short story, Franny and Zooey (1961); and a volume containing two novellas: Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenters and Seymour: An Introduction (1963). His last published work, a novella entitled "Hapworth 16, 1924", appeared in The New Yorker on June 19, 1965. Afterward, Salinger struggled with unwanted attention, including a legal battle in the 1980s with biographer Ian


References: http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._D._Salinger http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Catcher_in_the_rye

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