The Catcher In The Rye Analysis

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The ongoing curiosity that dwells in individuals is a pathway to discoveries accompanied by different unexpected experiences and challenges which result in an alternation of perspective of themselves and their surroundings. The importance of growth and protection, each precursors to discovering new worlds, which are extrapolated in William Shakespeare's 1661 tragicomedy ‘The Tempest and J.D. Salinger’s ‘Catcher in the Rye’ (1951). Shakespeare’s‘ The Tempest’, elucidates the transformative power of planned discoveries that manifest an individual's desire to re-evaluate assumptions and unveil fresh insights into humanity’s moral flaws. Similarly, The Catcher in the Rye’ demonstrates that physical and intellectual discoveries can elicit an emotional …show more content…
Through wanting to know more and seeking new information, individuals would experience their physical discoveries like new surroundings. J.D Salinger effectively conveys this idea, by portraying growth as a tool which shapes our personalities from naive children to very complexly emotional adults. Salinger’s ‘The Catcher in the Rye’ embodies Holden’s struggle to preserve the innocence of children and the inevitability of encountering the harsh reality of life. “...I have to catch everybody … I’d just be the catcher in the rye.” Through the utilisation of personal pronoun and a determined tone, it represents Holden’s belief of being the catcher in the rye, in preserving innocence from the evil and corrupt world.the audience sees his cynical, oversimplified view of other people, and a large part of his fantasy world based on the idea that children are simple and innocent whilst adults are superficial and hypocritical. However, Holden comes to accept his loss of innocence and realisation that he is unable to save all the children from growing up and experiencing life’s challenges. “... If they want to grab on the gold ring, you have to let them do it.” Through the utilisation of a solemn tone, he demonstrates that reaching for the gold ring is equivalent to reaching for hopes and dreams. He realises kids need to reach for their goals, even if that means watching them fall, because …show more content…
This concept is exemplified through J.D. Salinger’s ‘The Catcher in the Rye’, where Holden Caulfield is eager to seek isolation rather than human interaction. "I took my old hunting hat out and put it on. I knew I wouldn't meet anybody”. The symbolism of the red hat in “I took my old hunting hat” represents individuality as Holden further notes in how he “wouldn’t meet anybody. The hat is a way for Holden to wonder about the unknown world of innocence and thus to differentiate himself from people and exclude himself from society. Hence, indicate that Holden places great importance in isolating himself, due to his desire to escape the malicious adulthood. Although, he was convinced that the world was corrupted, he comes to realise through self-discovery that isolation from society deters him from transitioning of childhood to adulthood. “Hunting hat really give him quite a lot of protection but got soaked anyway.” The reflective tone, shows Holden’s belief in the power of protection that the hat possesses to isolate him from adulthood, but then comes to realise the uselessness of the hat from preventing his acceptance of the corruptness in the world. Therefore, Salinger successfully conveys the idea that despite the effort in preventing certain situations, there will be inevitably a discovery of

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