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The Breakfast Club

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Brittany Ochs April 11, 2013 Sociology Breakfast Club

“Jock”, “prep”, “loser”, “geek”, “criminal”, “ popular”, are just a few labels of teenagers that are used everyday by outsiders who judge them without looking skin deep. In the matter of stereotyping, some may perceive it as being the base of an identity in the view of society. Stereotyping is categorized and used as a positive view. As opposed to the film The Breakfast Club, that creates a more negative input on stereotyping. Peer groups have really changed over the years in a High school atmosphere. Peer groups in the 1980’s and still to this day when it comes to high school have major differences. In my opinion people in the 1980’s were just as selfish and stuck up when it came to that cliques. Personally I think it was way worse. 'Peer group pressure' is frequently thought to be an important factor influencing cigarette smoking, alcohol and other drug use. Kids at our school today I think have more respect for other students and our more considerate towards one another. Even though there has been a lot of changes from the 80’s until today, they’re most defiantly some similarities that stuck around for these years. Most schools reveal peer pressure. From what I have personally experienced this can make students change who they are, so that they are able to fit in with other students. Sometimes these students withdraw themselves, become anti social or feel that they have to be out spoken and make trouble for themselves. All of these characters types are conveyed in the film. It’s really all about at first is stereotypical people, anywhere you are you’re going to get judged with a room full of people could be good or bad, you’ll never know. Until you eventually fall into place with your type of group. The movie The Breakfast Club just goes to show that even though you come from all different groups that you can still all relate in many ways to each other. Acceptance is the act of approving of others for who they are, whether that be ethnicity, religion, social groups, or sexual orientation. In today’s society there are varying outlooks on how people are and why they should or should not be accepted. As shown in the movie The Breakfast Club people are not accepted for many reasons such as their high school cliques. In the movie the five students start out with a judgmental view of their classmates, but by the end of their Saturday detention they learn to accept themselves and others for who they really are.

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