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The Black Death: The Plague In The XIV Century

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The Black Death: The Plague In The XIV Century
It’s well known how devastating the Black Death was for Europe in the XIV century and that reached the maximum point between 1346 and 1361, killing one third of the continental population. From the big terror that provoked this unknown disease, people inclined to think that this was a supernatural occurrence. The Black Death was considered a divine punishment because of mortals sins. In plain desperation, guilty people were searched to calm this divine rage. It was told that Jews and lepers poisoned the wells and this unchained a wave of violence among them. Moreover, this fear to “others” (Jews, lepers) spread, this fear was as dangerous as the Black Death because it cause repercussions and unjust death that difficult the resistance of weakened

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