The night-blooming cereus only makes an appearance once a year during, as the name suggests, the nighttime. This “silvery and mysterious” (Kingsolver 250) sounding name is just one example of the rich world Barbara Kingsolver creates in The Bean Trees. The cereus is more than just a flower. Its blossom symbolizes a pivotal moment in the book, the departure of Taylor and her new friends in pursuit of a better life. The way Kingsolver creates these connective moments is one of her defining qualities. Point of view adds more dimension to these moments and is another one of Kingsolver’s essential qualities. Kingsolver’s work is defined by her ability to create connections within a narrative and the point of view she uses to convey her ideas. Kingsolver …show more content…
The setting acts as platform to enrich the growth within the characters. When Taylor starts her journey, her life is bleak and lifeless. She travelled through a place where “in the place of trees there were all these puffy-looking rocks” (47). But, when she meets Mattie, a “bright, wild wonderland of flowers and vegetables” (61) opens up. While these short descriptions of the landscape are not the driving force of the story, they highlight the transition from a lonely, desolate world to one of opportunity. Furthermore, Turtle’s defiance of her “failure to thrive” (166) condition reflects in the plant life throughout the book. From “cabbage and Brussels sprouts” (103) to the “bean trees” themselves, Kingsolver incorporates this idea that life will persevere. Kingsolver creates the message that things that “looked dead” (152) at one point can transform into a place where “you …show more content…
These concepts could have been used by anyone else. But, the ways Kingsolver manipulates the text are unique to her. Long and intricate metaphors throughout the text represent the struggles and triumphs of the characters. Variable points of view gives a full perspective of the situation. These are some of the tools Kingsolver uses with great skill and indicate Kingsolver’s own

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