THE BATTERED MAN: AN EVALUATION OF EQUAL JUSTICE UNDER THE LAW

Topics: Domestic violence, Violence, Violence against women Pages: 93 (33082 words) Published: July 30, 2014
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ABSTRACT
Within the last few decades, many of the efforts aimed at preventing domestic violence and helping victims have focused on violence against women. In fact, in social and legal venues, domestic violence is often exclusively considered a women‟s issue. However, domestic violence, particularly intimate partner violence, does not discriminate on any basis, including gender. This research focuses on male victims of domestic violence in order to show that domestic violence is a human issue, not a gender issue. Only when all victims of violent crime are acknowledged and treated fairly can society begin to solve the problem of domestic violence victimization. The intent of this thesis is to explore the incidence of victimization, the legal and societal representations, and legal treatment of male victims of intimate partner violence. Through the analysis of case law and statutes, quantitative statistics, domestic violence resources, popular culture, and anecdotal evidence, this thesis evaluates the treatment of male victims of intimate partner violence in the legal system. Evidence shows that gender bias exists and can affect battered men in numerous ways. Male petitioners seeking protective injunctions, prosecution of their violent partners, and resources, such as treatment, counseling, or shelter, often face discrimination against men. By raising awareness to domestic violence committed against men, this thesis aims to contribute not only to the legal discipline but also to solving the domestic violence epidemic in society—against all people. THE BATTERED MAN: AN EVALUATION OF EQUAL JUSTICE UNDER THE LAW by BRENNA M. EGAN A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Honors in the Major Program in Legal Studies in the College of Health and Public Affairs and in The Burnett Honors College at the University of Central Florida Orlando, Florida Spring Term 2010 Thesis Chair: Dr. Kathy Cook ii

ABSTRACT
Within the last few decades, many of the efforts aimed at preventing domestic violence and helping victims have focused on violence against women. In fact, in social and legal venues, domestic violence is often exclusively considered a women‟s issue. However, domestic violence, particularly intimate partner violence, does not discriminate on any basis, including gender. This research focuses on male victims of domestic violence in order to show that domestic violence is a human issue, not a gender issue. Only when all victims of violent crime are acknowledged and treated fairly can society begin to solve the problem of domestic violence victimization. The intent of this thesis is to explore the incidence of victimization, the legal and societal representations, and legal treatment of male victims of intimate partner violence. Through the analysis of case law and statutes, quantitative statistics, domestic violence resources, popular culture, and anecdotal evidence, this thesis evaluates the treatment of male victims of intimate partner violence in the legal system. Evidence shows that gender bias exists and can affect battered men in numerous ways. Male petitioners seeking protective injunctions, prosecution of their violent partners, and resources, such as treatment, counseling, or shelter, often face discrimination against men. By raising awareness to domestic violence committed against men, this thesis aims to contribute not only to the legal discipline but also to solving the domestic violence epidemic in society—against all people. iii

DEDICATION
For victims of domestic violence, especially those without a voice, For my mentors, Kathy Cook, Kelly Astro, and Cindy Schmidt, for pushing me to achieve my highest goals, And especially, for my mother, Melanie Egan, my role model and best friend. You have made me the woman I am today. iv

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
I would like to express my deepest gratitude to all those who made my thesis possible. Thank you to the Misti Fontaine, Justine Winik, and the...

References: Yick, A., & Patrick, P.K.S. (2007). Dating violence. In N.A. Jackson (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Domestic Violence (pp. 231-233). New York: Routledge.
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