The Archetypal Quest - Comparing "The Epic of Gilgamesh" to "The Wizard of Oz"

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The Archetypal Quest In almost every book you read, you will find that someone always has to go on some sort of journey or quest (Rice). If you examine each quest closely, you will notice that they are all very similar (Rice). When things are used repeatedly like that, they are said to have an archetypal pattern (Rice). The quest on which all these heroes go on is referred to as the archetypal quest (Rice). “The Wizard of Oz” focuses on a small-town girl living in Kansas. “The Epic of Gilgamesh” focuses on an arrogant king who rules the city of Uruk. The Wizard of Oz and The Epic of Gilgamesh were written 5000 years apart, but they both contain the elements that make them archetypal quests.
One of the stages in the hero’s quest is when they are introduces into their ordinary world (Rice). At this stage, the character is shown living their everyday life in their hometown (Rice). There are two types of characters at this stage (Rice). One is a character who had some sort of special birth and is usually more powerful than others (Rice). The other character is an unlikely hero that has an unknown background and is raised by someone other than their birth parents (Rice). Gilgamesh from “The Epic of Gilgamesh” fits the first type of character. He is the king of Uruk and was created by the gods. The gods made him 2/3 god and 1/3 man. Dorothy from “The Wizard of Oz” fits the second type of character. She lives on a farm in Kansas and is being raised by her aunt and uncle (The Wizard…). Dorothy and Gilgamesh both are living in their ordinary world, which fits the archetypal pattern.
Near the beginning of the story the hero must begin his or her adventure (Rice). This can be referred to as the hero crossing the first threshold (Rice). The character leaves his or her world and enters a new world (Rice). The first threshold in “The Epic of Gilgamesh” is when Gilgamesh decides to fight Humbaba. It is at this point that he sets out on his journey to make himself more liked by

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