The Affects of Temperature on Amount of Oxygen, Mung Beans (Vigna Radiata) Consume During Cellular Respiration

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Amount of Oxygen, Mung Beans (Vigna Radiata) Consume during Cellular Respiration

Introduction:

Cellular respiration is a catabolic reaction that refers to the process of converting chemical energy of organic molecules into a simplify form so it can be used immediately by organism. Glucose may be oxidized completely if sufficient oxygen is available, by the following equation:
C6H12O6 + 36 ADP + 36Pi + 6O2(g) 6 H2O + 6 CO2(g) + 38 ATP + heat
All organisms, including plants and animals, oxidize glucose for energy. Often, this energy is used to convert ADP and phosphate into ATP. The process of complete oxidation involves glycolysis, Krebs cycle and electron transport chain. Besides ATP, pyruvate molecules, NADH and FADH2 will be generated to aid the process in aerobic respiration. These chains of reactions happen in cytoplasm. It enters into mitochondrial matrix and releases its final product in the form of energy, water and carbon dioxide. In balancing the process, oxygen is being consumed (Campbell, 2008).
In this experiment, Mung bean seeds (Vigna Radiata) were used to measure the rate of cellular respiration. The consumption of oxygen by Mung bean seeds will be measured as weight specific respiration by measuring volume of oxygen consumed, incubation time and weight of Mung bean seeds (ml h-1 kg-1). A respirator will be used to regulate the external and internal air pressure. Carbon dioxide will be produced as oxygen is consumed therefore to eliminate pressure from effecting the measurement, a chemical will be added that will selectively remove CO2. In order to regulate the external pressure that might force changes in the respirator, a closed system was implemented. Potassium hydroxide, KOH, will chemically react with CO2 by the following equation: (Frankel, 2005)
2 KOH + CO2 K2CO3H2O
There were a few objectives in this experiment. The first objective is to determine whether the germinating Mung bean seeds go through cellular respiration. Second



Cited: 1) Campbell A. Neil, Reece B, Jane, Urry A. Lisa, Cain L. Michael, Wasserman A. Steven, Minorsky V. Peter and Jackson B. Robert. 2008. Biology, 8th ed. Pearson Benjamin Cummings Publishing. San Francisco, California. Pp. 163-177 2) Danyk, Helena. 2012. The Cellular Basis of Life Laboratory Manual. Department of Biological Science. University of Lethbridge, 2012. Pp. 54-56. 3) Frankel, J., et al. Principles of Biology I Laboratory Manual Fifth Edition. Pearson Custom Publishing, Boston. 2005. pp.37-42

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