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Teen Sex and Sexuality

By meka8217 Oct 19, 2008 2104 Words
Shameka Honore
COM 220
Barbara Hawley
October 4, 2008

Teen Sex and Teen Sexuality you asked what is this in today's teens. The subject of sex and sexuality often's scares parents. Talking to your teen about sex is not easy, its feelings that shake you are strong and confusing, some parents say the thought of there teens have sex are having sexuality issues brings tears and angry. No parent wants to think that child is having sex or even think that child may be gay; there is so much going own in today's society we really need to prepare our children for it.

We live in a world of sex and sexuality in young teens are like sponges in the beginning of their lives, they tend to soak up everything in their surroundings, study show that viewing aggression can have a huge influence on a teens , by spending time with them reading or watching what they watch or teach them developmental assets will encourage them to make better discussion in life, this world has changed drastically and we as parents, educator and individuals that care about young teens has to come together and do what is necessary to protect our young teens . Have you been putting off talking to your children about sex because you're not sure how to broach the subject? Stop putting off the inevitable! By answering your children questions as they arise, you can help foster healthy feelings about sex. Get tips for talking about the birds and the bees with your children. You have to be real with your kids if you don’t talk to them about sex and sexuality you get mad when they become pregnant well they tried to talk to you and you didn’t want to listen . Then you ask the question how can I become more involved with my teen well you need to talk to them, listen to them, and don’t try to be their friend be the parent. When it comes to our teens as parents, educators and people who are concerned about the welfare of our teens and the choices they make should be our first pority. Teaching them about sex and the conqunice, that come along with it should be taught to them wich should limited what they watch on television, or listen to on the raido.We have so many teens having sex and becoming parents at a early age, and gay teens and you wonder why the world is the way it is we are not teaching them. Among the findings that surprised me: Although prevalent attitudes on teen sex differ in Western Europe and the United States, the views of leading researchers and doctors on both sides of the Atlantic do not. Their opinions lean much closer to the European model. They tend to agree that the mixed message America sends to teens about sex -- authorities say, "don't" while mass media screams "What are you waiting for?"-- endanger our children. The outcome Levels of teen sexual activity look remarkably similar here and abroad, but U.S. rates of teen pregnancy, childbirth, abortion and sexually transmitted diseases are among the highest of all industrialized nations, despite recent decreases. Read brief accounts of how Western European and American perspectives compare. (By Elizabeth Agnvall Special to The Washington Post Tuesday, May 16, 2006; Page HE01) What Can Parents Do? While parents cannot control when their children will have sex or whether they will use contraception, their values and parenting style can make a difference, show studies by Robert Blum at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and others. To help parents talk with their kids about love, sex and relationships, Blum recommends this advice from the National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy: • Be clear about your own sexual values and attitudes. • Talk early and often with your children about sex. • Help teenagers find options for their future that are more attractive than early pregnancy and parenthood. • Let your teens know that you value education. • Know what your kids are watching, reading and listening to. • Supervise and monitor your children. • Know your children's friends and their families. • Discourage early, frequent and steady dating. • Build close, caring relationships with your children early in childhood. (The Washigtion Post Company May 16, 2006; Page HE04) This graphs shows the different between gay girls and gay boys in the 1970’s and 1990’s and as you view this graph you will see how much it has change. Then you can also look at the second graph and see the incress in teens having sex.

HAD SEX BY: AGE 10AGE 12AGE 15AGE 18
TEEN GIRLS:25%50%75%85%
TEEN BOYS:30%55%80%95%

Urban minority girls are at considerable risk for the negative health consequences of early sexual activity. Yet few researchers have explored the sources of information about sexual issues for these adolescents, particularly parent-child communication. As part of a larger qualitative study examining social cognitions about sexuality among urban girls, 72 African American and Latina mothers and 72 daughters representing two age groups (6-9 and 10-13) participated in focus group sessions. Both mothers and daughters addressed the cues associated with the timing of these conversations in the course of the daughters’ development; the content of their conversations, including the messages mothers used to influence girls’ decision-making; and the approaches or strategies both employed. The authors’ analyses indicate that beneficial communication may be preempted by the antagonistic positions adopted by daughters and mothers as daughters advance sexually. Daughters may in fact benefit more from receiving sex education from other close source. (Journal of Adolescent Research, Vol. 16, No. 3, 269-292 (2001) ) When teens ask questions about sex, parents worry. It is not always easy for parents to discuss sexual issues with their children. Today, with the serious consequences of teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases, it is more important than ever to have these talks. Teens have many questions and need the facts. They also need your advice on family values. You can lay down the law, but you cannot control your teens every waking moment. The best you can do is give information and let teens know that you are there to listen and support them. It is a good idea to start talking about sex with children before girls get their first menstrual period or boys get their first wet dream, so they will know that these events are normal. It is also important to tell them that sex should involve human feelings, such as commitment, belonging, self-esteem, and love. It is OK to feel nervous about this topic. Statistics reveal a high rate of virginity among US teenagers in the 21st century than earlier. Risks of unwanted pregnancies, fear of HIV infection, a stable family background and improved sex education for adolescents are the causes for this trend. Pop culture tells young people that sex is an act of self-expression, a personal choice for physical pleasure that can be summed up in the ubiquitous phrase, "hooking up." They are told that as long as they use protection and avoid STDs or out-of-wedlock pregnancies, there are no consequences. However, what happens when those relationships end? "Hooked: New Science on How Casual Sex is Affecting Our Children" uncovers new research on the impact that sex, even "safe" sex, can have on the adolescent brain. Written by physicians Joe S. McIlhaney, Jr., M.D. and Freda McKissic Bush, M.D., "Hooked" is a journey of exploration into the mind, the most powerful sex organ of all (see also Medical Institute for Sexual Health). Based on studies and data from the Medical Institute for Sexual Health, a nonprofit medical, educational, and research organization, "Hooked" reveals groundbreaking evidence showing that when couples become sexually active, they release a series of brain chemicals that can result in powerful emotional bonding. Once "hooked," the couple has a bond that is not easily broken. When separation does occur, it has a chemical and biological impact on the brain - an impact that affects future behavior and happiness. "Millions of American teenagers and young adults are finding that the psychological baggage of casual sex is affecting their lives," said Gary Rose, MD, President and CEO of the Medical Institute. "They are discovering that 'hooking up' is the easy part, but 'unhooking' from a sexual relationship is a lot harder and can have serious consequences." The risks of unprotected sex and unhealthy sexual behavior are widely known. More than 700,000 unplanned pregnancies and 19 million new Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) occur in the United States each year. But too few young people consider the emotional and psychological risks of casual sex - bonds that are certain to be formed, regardless of precautionary measures. When these bonds are broken, the trauma can create negative patterns in their behavior and thinking that last a lifetime. More than just stern warning about teenage sex, "Hooked" is a journey of discovery into the human brain when we are at our most vulnerable, and speaks to every parent and child who must consider the true consequences of sex. (Medical Institute for Sexual Health. This article was prepared by Science Letter editors from staff and other reports. Copyright 2008, Science Letter via NewsRx.com.)

Gay teens are at sharply elevated risk for depression, eating disorders, and the use of alcohol, drugs, and cigarettes. They are very likely to be the victims of bullying and/or violence. More often than we would like to believe, they risk rejection by their families when they "come out," and fall prey to all of the dangers of the streets--from rape, prostitution, and sexual enslavement to malnutrition and parasites. There is another threat that makes me overcome my reluctance to ask the difficult questions, even when I am uncomfortable. It is suicide. Suicide is three times more common among gay and transgender youth than among the general population. Fully a third of homosexual youth actually attempt suicide. That is not ideation; it is the actual attempt. Serious, overt discrimination is perpetrated against gays in our culture; 32 years after the American Psychiatric Association acknowledged homosexuality is not a disorder. Because youths having sexual identity questions are aware at an early age that they are different from many of their peers, some of the most vulnerable patients in our practices do not know what to do with themselves or where to turn. They may distance themselves from family and friends, becoming isolated and depressed. The issues begin early. In middle school, a quarter of 12-year-olds are uncertain about their sexual orientation. While this confusion is so common as to be really normal in terms of development, the very uncertainty can lead to unhappiness, worry, and reclusiveness. There are many approaches to bringing up the subject. The American Academy of Pediatrics, in guidelines published in 2004, suggests asking: "When you think of people to whom you are sexually attracted, are they men, women, both, neither, or are you not sure?" I like that question because it addresses thoughts, not just actions, and gets at the critical issue of gender identity. Yet I find the question cumbersome. Another question the AAP recommends asking is, "Have you had a romantic relationship with a boy or a girl?" I like how this question, by using the word "romantic," avoids making assumptions about sexual behavior. Sexual behavior is associated with physical risk factors, but gay or transgender orientations can also be associated with emotional and psychological peril, even among youths who don't act on their feelings. In conclusion, you should get you teen and sit down and talk to your teen about sex and becoming teen parents, and if you teen tells you that are having sexuality issue don't get mad sit down and talk to your child let them know you love them and you are there for them what ever there Decision may be, I know you may be upset but a great parent will be there and listen to there kids, lets try to teach our children and get them ready for the world today.

Reference Page:

Agnvall, Elizabeth (2006). The Washgtion Post Company. , :

. Howard, Barbara. (2005). International Medical News Group. Pediatric News, Retrieved October 2, 2008, from University of Phoenix Library database. Journal of Adolescent Research. (2001). 16 (3), 269-292. Retrieved October 2, 2008 from University of Phoenix library database. Medical Institute for Sexual Health. (2008), Retrieved October 2, 2008 from University of Phoenix database.

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