talk to teachers

Satisfactory Essays
Kiana McNair
Talerico/ 3rd Period
AP English
10/20/13
Revision

" A Talk to Teachers" Analysis Essay

Every african american has their struggle in life. they struggle with mostly finances and trying to find a job. but now a days most african american struggle with trying to find their child the best education they deserve. in the 1960's african americans had problem with educational system. in the speech "a talk to teachers" james baldwin begins his arguement by describing the purpose of education and the teachers and school system should be dedicated to their students. In
Baldwins arguement he starts it off with a statement " no society is really anxious to have that kind of person around" this statement is basically saying they do not want a person who is not engaged in students lives, a person who does not care about the kids education. In my opinion i would never give that person a time of day if your not going to take the time out of your day and help me with my education.

Baldwin's message in this speech is confusing yet conflicting. Yet again he is trying to express that following the rules of society is the right thing to do, but most folks are just giving two cents about any rules that are given. But in Baldwins case, as he relates to being a poor black child, he tries to connect what happen to him, to whats happening now and sees that things that is happening in the society is not so good. He figures out how many black children deserved the education they received.

In my opinion i feel as if most surburban kids get more opportunites then more african americans which is selfish, I say if surburban kids are offered a great education theu should go ahead and take it instead of playing around with it.

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