Taliesin West

Powerful Essays
“Human houses should not be like boxes, blazing in the sun, nor should we outrage the Machine by trying to make dwelling places too complementary to Machinery. Any building for humane purposes should be an elemental, sympathetic feature of the ground, complementary to its nature-environment, belonging by kinship to the terrain.”
- Frank Lloyd Wright Brilliant, inspirational, influential, innovative; these are a just a few adjectives that illustrate a very significant man with many traits. A pioneer in his field of work and study, Frank Lloyd Wright has a plethora of architectural masterpieces spread out throughout the world. Wright was born In Richland Center, Wisconsin on June 8, 1867. His father gave him the love for music, but it was his mother who encouraged him to become an architect. Wright attended Madison High School, and it was then and there where he first began to realize his aspirations of being an architect. After dropping out of high school, and two semesters of studying civil engineering at the University of Wisconsin, Wright moved to Chicago in 1887. Wright found work at the architectural firm of Joseph Lyman Silsbee, however Wrights ambition took him to the architectural firm of Alder and Sullivan. Louis Sullivan was an inspirational figure in Wrights career and eventually led him to be the architect is he known as today. Wright adapted Sullivan’s slogan “form follows function” and changed it into the phrase “form and function are one.” It was right then when Wright introduced the word ‘organic’ into his philosophy of architecture. A term that was coined by Frank Lloyd Wright himself, Organic architecture is the harmonization between human habitation and the natural environment. It strives to entail a value for natural materials, blending in with the environment and surroundings, with a natural expression of the function of the building. Organic architecture, as Frank Lloyd Wright defined it, means “not just looking at

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