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The cure for Canada’s failing universal healthcare system
One of the institutions that many Canadians take pride in is the universal health care system. So much so, that it has evolved to be an article of national pride and identity. In 1984, the Canada Health Act was created for the purpose of achieving a public health care system that provides reasonable access to medically necessary services. Canadians should realize that the publicly funded health care system is currently not achieving that purpose. The system is inaccessible, non-comprehensive and is an unsustainable burden on the economy. Consequently, the Canadian Government should implement a private health care sector which will strengthen the overall economy, be accessible and heighten the comprehensiveness of care in Canada.
Firstly, the current Canadian health care system framework is becoming increasingly unsustainable and a secondary private health care sector will allow the public health care sector to operate in a sustainable manner, increase Canada’s sovereign debt rating and increase the budget for other economically beneficial government programming. To begin, implementing a secondary private health care system will discourage higher taxation rates. A recent report from British Columbia’s Finance Minister states that British Columbia is on track to be spending 71% of its revenue on health care by 2017 and if current spending on education is maintained at 27% there will be virtually nothing left for other areas of provincial responsibility (Stuart et. al). As seen in Figure 1, BC is not alone. In fact, Canadian Provincial Healthcare expenditures have been increasing over the past 14 years. In just 5 years Canada could face a severe fiscal budget crisis and in order to maintain current provincial programs they will be forced to implement creative new tax schemes to supplement government revenues. This use of fiscal policy will increase the cost of production and prices of goods and services.



Cited: CBC News. "Health-care costs could downgrade Canada 's credit - Health - CBC News." CBC.ca - Canadian News Sports Entertainment Kids Docs Radio TV. CBC, 31 Jan. 2012. Web. 29 Nov. 2012. <http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/story/2012/01/31/standard-poors-health-care-costs.html>. CBC News. " 'Wealth equals health, ' Canadian doctors say - Health - CBC News." CBC.ca - Canadian News Sports Entertainment Kids Docs Radio TV. CBC, 13 Aug. 2012. Web. 29 Nov. 2012. <http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/story/2012/08/10/health-income-cma.html>. Dhalla, Irfan. "Private Health Insurance: An International Overview and Considerations for Canada." Healthcare Quaterly Sep. - Oct. 2007: 89-96. Longswood.com. Web. 29 Nov. 2012. Grenier, Eric. "Canada Health Care: Country Favors Mixed Model System According To Poll." Huffington Post Canada - Canadian News Stories, Breaking News, Opinion. Huffington Post Canada , 29 June 2012. Web. 29 Nov. 2012. <http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2012/06/29/canadians-mixed-system-health-care_n_1636796.html>. MacQueen, Ken. "Our health care delusion - Canada, Health - Macleans.ca." Macleans.ca - Canada News, World News, Politics, Business, Culture, Health, Environment, Education . Macleans Magazine, 25 Jan. 2011. Web. 29 Nov. 2012. <http://www2.macleans.ca/2011/01/25/our-health-care-delusion>. Rachlis, Michael. "Privatized Health Care Won 't Deliver ." Wellesly Institute 1 (2007): 1-32. Print. Stuart, Neil, and Jim Adams. "The Sustainability of Canada 's Healthcare System: A Framework for Advancing the Debate." Healthcare Quarterly Apr. - May. 2007: 96-103. Longswood.com. Web. 28 Nov. 2012.

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