Supreme Court Case Study Of Gibbons V. Ogden

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In Gibbons v. Ogden, the Supreme Court held that the word commerce comprehended navigation, and that it had the power to regulate navigation. Secondly, the Supreme Court held that navigation involved the control of navigable waters, and included the power to keep them open and free from obstruction, and to make improvements. Thirdly, the Supreme Court concluded that under the commerce clause Congress had the power to authorize improvements in waters within the limits of a state

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