Supporting Children’s Personality Development Through Literature Experiences

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Supporting Children’s Personality Development Through Literature Experiences
Danielle Stewart
ECE Children’s Literature
Instructor: Michelle Caron Phillips
January 15, 2012

The ability to develop and maintain positive social relationships is an essential aspect of healthy human development (Positive Child Outcomes, 2003). Nevertheless, some children are very challenged in their social and emotional development. According to the Department of Health and Human Services Administration for Children and Families, positive social-emotional development provides a base for life-long learning; social skills and emotional self regulation, and are integrally related to later academic success (Positive Child Outcomes, 2003). Unfortunately, there comes a time when some children have a difficult time in establishing and maintaining positive social relationships. Children who lack skills in self control, cooperation, and social relationships tend to exhibit aggression and disruptiveness. Other behaviors include an unsporting attitude when losing, a domineering mindset, and they are bossy. Teachers can intervene by drawing the children’s attention to the feelings or experiences of others, helping them to remember their feelings or experiences in similar situations, and by planning cooperative activities (Positive Child Outcomes, 2003). According to Giorgis and Glazer, personality determines our attitudes, interests, behavioral patterns, emotional responses, social roles, and other individual traits that expand throughout our lifetimes (Giorgis & Glazer, 2009). Books offer opportunities for helping children to appropriately resolve conflict and develop positive self concept. Children need opportunities to recognize their own value and make appropriate choices as they express themselves in socially acceptable ways. (Giorgis & Glazer, 2009). When planning to share books with children to choose books that will meet the needs, but be mindful of the



References: Berns, R (2010). Child, family, school, community. Belmont, California: Wadsworth Cengage Learning Giorgis, C & Glazer, J (2009). Literature for young children Boston, MA: Allyn and Bacon of Pearson United States Head Start Bureau (2003).  Head Start path to positive child outcomes.  Washington DC:  United States Department of Health and Human Services Witt, G.A. & Mossler, R.A. (2010). Adult development and life assessment. Retrieved from https://content.ashford.edu/AUSP202.10.1

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