Summary Of Samuel Heilmann's Interpretation Of Religion

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The interpretation of sacred scripture is crucial in finding meaning in the pursuit of a religion. Samuel Heilmann was stuck between the “two worlds” in which he lives: his life as a professor of Sociology and his life as a devoted Jew. The study of Judaism’s holy writing’s in a Jewish community in Jerusalem, whose act Heilmann described as lernen, enabled him to find himself. To do so, Heilmann attempted to get rid of his sociological way of thinking about religion. Instead, he intended to find meaning in his religious practices, which he felt was often missing. Before his retreat from modern US American society, Heilmann never seemed to have had an experience of the sacred. However, the conduct of religious rituals and the act of lernen in

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