Preview

Summary Of Immigration's Aftermath '

Satisfactory Essays
Open Document
Open Document
292 Words
Grammar
Grammar
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Writing
Writing
Score
Score
Summary Of Immigration's Aftermath '
Immigration’s Aftermath Through his essay, "Immigration’s Aftermath" Alejandro Portes portrays the long term effect of the ongoing events of the immigrants getting into America and taking the lob paying jobs. Portes starts his essay by giving statistics of the U.S census and keeping his readers interested in how the face of America is being changed by immigrants. I agree to that statement and I also believe that America is a melting pot meaning, America is made up of many different people from many different countries so really there is no such thing as American if you think about it. Anyway, Portes goes on and talk about how the labor need of the American society is the main reason why immigrants are constantly being brought or accepted

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    The analysis gives an account of the migratory reasons of immigrants to the United States. These individuals left for economic reasons that were also promoted not only by family members on the US side of the border but also because of popular culture. Many came to the United States in hopes of the American dream but as we see in Leo Chavez’s book, although this population integrates itself economically, culturally, and socially into the United States society, much of the time their legal status becomes a determining factor of how much or how fully they will incorporate themselves. We see that it is very hard for them to incorporate themselves and assimilate as their citizenship status hinders their ability to attain necessary resources. The issue then becomes generational as the opportunities of immigrants will be different then those of their children and their future generations in the United States. We see that initiatives like The Bracero Program had previously allowed immigration for labor purposes during World War II but as economic insecurity began to grow, the upward movement became an outlet for possible upward economic mobility. This transnational movement created a phenomenon that established networks for the immigrant community. This networks also made it harder for this community to consider re-establishment in their native countries as…

    • 1633 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Gonzales develops his thesis by asserting that Latin American immigration and Latino presence in the United States are markedly different from European immigration history to this country in at least three main ways: Latino immigration is closely tied to the growth and needs of the U.S. empire; race and language attitudes in this country have had the effect of moving Latin Americans not from immigrant to mainstream status, but rather from an immigrant to a racial caste status and how Latin Americans have arrived when the United States is already the dominant world power. “Harvest of Empire” mentions how since the 1820’s Mexicans have migrated to the United States. They’re the second largest immigrant nationality in our history. Meixco is the most populous Spanish speaking country in the world. Most of the country’s wealth flows outside of Mexico, meaning the U.S. After the tragedy of World War II , the United States reached an agreement with Mexico to import Mexicans for a certain period of time and after their harvest was done they’ll go back to their country. This was the bracero program, which brought millions of immigrants into the United States only for seasonal work and once they were supposed to leave, they managed to stay illegally in order for them to provide to their families. World War II also made Mexican Americans active in the U.S…

    • 1351 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    The key concepts of this paper are social, economic and political effects of illegal immigrants who are allowed to stay in the United States. Social effects of immigration arguably include the position of new immigrants such as Vietnamese, Russian, Israeli, Mexican, Columbian, Chinese, Korean and other types of immigrants as criminals (Duignan, 2003). This means that America’s society is effected by the amount of immigrants in its jails. This argues that more immigrants increase the number of criminal activity, making the country less safe. Economic effects argue, for example, that native people of a country do benefit from immigration, because of productive relationships between immigrant workers and other factors of production (Borjas, 1995).…

    • 185 Words
    • 1 Page
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The benefits of immigration is that it allows us to fill our workforce with people willing to work, which in turn increases production. When immigrants come into this country they normally come to work and live the american dream. This desire, results in a work ethic that in some occasions cannot be matched by US citizens, so jobs that US citizens are unwilling to do are done by immigrants willing to work. This increase in employment generates more revenue for the Government through taxes. The more people in the US working the more money the Gov. will have. Immigration also diversifies our society, unlike any other country. The more diverse our country is the more we will learn about other cultures and judge others less. The cost of immigration is that it can undermine American workers because, immigrants are used to working for lower wages in other countries so when they come to the US they take jobs from americans because they work for less. This leaves many Americans unemployed and unhappy. Also, many immigrants that come into this country do not have much money, so they need Government aid. The increase in immigrants is a huge burden on public programs. Another cost, is that some immigrants come into the US to avoid prosecution from their country. Immigrants like this is a danger to our society and raises our crime rates. I agree with most of the immigration policies such as Arizona’s law that allows police officers to check anyone’s citizenship and report anyone who is illegally in this country. I agree with this policy because anyone in this country illegal is breaking the law and should be treated like a criminal. Im okay with allowing immigrants into this country, I do not want to close the boarders, however there is a right way to do it. A policy I disagree with is denying healthcare to an illegal immigrant. Although they are in the country illegally I do believe every human has the right to healthcare and should be assisted regardless of citizenship or willingness…

    • 347 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    David Cole's "Five Myths about Immigration," while not a persuasive argument, is obviously a personal issue for the author who believes Americans treat immigrants poorly. He introduces the reader to "Know Nothings," or "Native Americans," who blame every problem in America on the immigrants (Cole 189-90). In the introductory paragraph, Cole attempts to obtain the reader's sympathetic feelings as he writes with great passion when he describes the mistreatment his Irish Catholic immigrant ancestors endured (190). This in turn raises the question of how objective he could remain when presenting his arguments. Coles' attempts to disprove the five myths about immigrants are not effective as his tone is often too personal, clouding his judgment, and his statistics and some data are either lacking credibility or logic.…

    • 850 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    New immigrants faced several challenges upon moving to America in the 1800’s. These challenges include assimilation, exclusion, and overcrowding. Assimilation is the absorption of immigrants/outsiders into a certain culture. This essay will cover five different documents explaining the aforementioned points with sufficient evidence. Starting off: assimilation.…

    • 419 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    In the information text, “on the trail of the Immigrants,” Edward Steiner describes the message of the article by describing the Immigrants journey at the gateway, under the huge portal of the vast hall waiting for their final judgment, said in paragraph 2. Steiner is describing not only their journey, but also the mixed emotions and feelings that are also going on, paragraph 5. Steiner describes their feelings by saying, “already a sifting process has taken place; families have been divided.” When Steiner says, “The sifting process has taken place.” The immigrants are taking that in a mean way, because you can’t sift people, so the attendants are treating…

    • 393 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    obligation for any nation to allow others to enter or to work, in fact, most…

    • 1724 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    anna quindlen's essay

    • 349 Words
    • 1 Page

    Essay In Anna Quindlen's essay " A Quilt of a Country " she writes about how a country with so many people of different cultures, ethnicities ,religions, skin colors and sexual preferences can unite as one after a devastating event such as 9/11. The United States of America is a very assorted country with many different ethnicities that don't usually get along. In her essay she gives us examples of how the people of America are combined despite their differences by telling us how Arab cab drivers will chauffeur Jewish passengers and yet speak in theory of hatred for one another. Other places in the world like Europe use countries to separate ethnicities, but the United States of America put all ethnicities into one country to unite as one. In the essay she also says how the Mexican immigrants of today are not very different from the Italian and Irish immigrants from back then.This is a powerful essay because it shows us that the immigrants who become citizens of the United States have worked hard to be here. Most of the immigrants start out in small jobs like Ma and Pa stores. I like how Leonel Castillo points out that the Ma and Pa stores that were once owned by Italian, Jewish and Eastern European immigrants are now owned by the Korean, Vietnamese, Iraqi, Jordanian, and Latin American immigrants of today. This statement shows that the immigrants entering the United States today very different from the first immigrants. The United States is also very excepting of all sexual preferences and homosexuality is becoming nationally accepted.…

    • 349 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    For centuries, immigrants have traveled to the Americas for a variety of reasons: equal opportunities, fresh starts, or to ensure a better life for themselves or their families. Many immigrants, who left their home countries to come to somewhere else (the Americas in this case), were not necessarily treated how they expected. Many faced mistreatment and cruelty from the citizens, while also being unable to find a job due to their background. This salvo caused the benefits of immigration to hide away, which left many wondering why they had immigrated in the first place. Although immigration’s benefits were not clearly visible immediately due to poverty and mistreatment due to background, the benefits were much more apparent later when those…

    • 928 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Since 2010, there has been a surge in immigration to Europe, and since 2014, the problem has gotten worse. There has been a massive influx in immigrants to Europe, mainly from war torn countries like Syria, Afghanistan, Iraq, and Central Africa. Ever since, there has also been a major influx in crime, most likely caused by these immigrants. The problem must be dealt with, and very quickly, or else Europe will see its downfall due to its own generosity.…

    • 1181 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Immigration is a widely controversial topic, so each state has their own laws relating to immigration. In the first six months of the year 2016, “Lawmakers in 41 states enacted 70 and 159 resolutions related to immigration” (Morse). All 229 of those laws were broken down into nine categories: including budgets, health, law enforcement, and education. Tennessee enacted laws regarding employment. Tennessee’s law states, “employers with 50 or more employees, on or after Jan. 1, 2017, to enroll in the E-Verify program to verify the work authorization status of employees hired on or after that date” (Morse). This means that Tennessee wants to be aware of the immigrants in the state, because their laws are not welcoming of immigrants. Hawaii also…

    • 248 Words
    • 1 Page
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Immigration is a daily problem that nearly all countries face, especially the United States. Most immigrants travel from Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador. Traveling the distance to the border is a long and dangerous trek, most die while on the way to find a new beginning. Children attempt to make the journey to escape their dangerous homes. The few that make it into the United States wait years to achieve their dreams to be free and safe.…

    • 359 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Immigration can impact the work of any country. We're focusing on how it can impact the lives and work of others in other countries, and why immigration starts to happen throughout the whole word. The effects of immigration on the U.S. has dramatically improved the work in facilities and job employments (Giovanni). As people immigrate to the U.S., airport security has to be really secured to be sure that no harmful chemicals or weapons enter the U.S. as it can cause chaos to U.S. Citizens. Immigration can be caused by social reasons, family problems, or low income earnings at a job. Immigration can affect the production of factories and efficiency, as well as increase the job production and expansion of factories. Immigrants that are working…

    • 159 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Immigration, especially in mass numbers is fueled by a number of reasons. Each event is bound to have positive and negative effects but when the positive effects outweigh the cons, the event is good and advantageous. Whatever the push and the pull reasons for immigration are, both the immigrants and the country hosting them get to gain.…

    • 324 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays

Related Topics