Sulfur Cycle

Good Essays
Sulfur Cycle
Sulfur (S), the tenth most abundant element in the universe, is a brittle, yellow, tasteless, and odorless non-metallic element. It comprises many vitamins, proteins, and hormones that play critical roles in both climate and in the health of various ecosystems. The majority of the Earth's sulfur is stored underground in rocks and minerals, including as sulfate salts buried deep within ocean sediments.
The sulfur cycle contains both atmospheric and terrestrial processes. Within the terrestrial portion, the cycle begins with the weathering of rocks, releasing the stored sulfur. The sulfur then comes into contact with air where it is converted into sulfate (SO4). The sulfate is taken up by plants and microorganisms and is converted into organic forms; animals then consume these organic forms through foods they eat, thereby moving the sulfur through the food chain. As organisms die and decompose, some of the sulfur is again released as a sulfate and some enters the tissues of microorganisms. There are also a variety of natural sources that emit sulfur directly into the atmosphere, including volcanic eruptions, the breakdown of organic matter in swamps and tidal flats, and the evaporation of water.

Sulfur eventually settles back into the Earth or comes down within rainfall. A continuous loss of sulfur from terrestrial ecosystem runoff occurs through drainage into lakes and streams, and eventually oceans. Sulfur also enters the ocean through fallout from the Earth's atmosphere. Within the ocean, some sulfur cycles through marine communities, moving through the food chain. A portion of this sulfur is emitted back into the atmosphere from sea spray. The remaining sulfur is lost to the ocean depths, combining with iron to form ferrous sulfide which is responsible for the black color of most marine sediments.
Since the Industrial Revolution, human activities have contributed to the amount of sulfur that enters the atmosphere, primarily through the

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    What Is Sulfur?

    • 381 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Sulfur Physical and chemical properties: Sulfur is classified as an odourless, tasteless, soft, light yellow solid. It is insoluble in water, but is soluble in carbon disulfide. Sulfur is very reactive; it reacts with all metals except gold and platnium, forming sulfides. It also forms compounds with various non-metallic elements. Sulfur forms over 30 solid allotropes. Sulfur is a chalogen (group 16 of the periodic table) and a non metal. Sulfur's atomic weight is 32.06. It has 16 electrons, protons…

    • 381 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Sulfur (Sulphureum)

    • 388 Words
    • 2 Pages

    The element I pick for my project is Sulfur (Sulphureum). The atomic number is 16, the atomic mass is 32.065, and it is located at period number 3, group number 16 and group name; Chalcogen. Sulfur is by far one of the tenth most abundant elements in the universe, the types of abundant elements in this universe would include of Hydrogen, helium, oxygen and more. Sulfur was founded or well convinced it was an element in around the 1777, by Antoine Lavoisier, who was a French nobleman and chemist.…

    • 388 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Chaney Mineralogy Spring 2013 Amanda Patterson Mineral Commodity Sulfur Sulfur is a nonmetallic element that was founded in 1777 by Antoine Lavoisier. The element falls in the sixteenth group of the periodic table. Sulfur’s symbol is S and it’s atomic weight is 32.064 grams. Sulfur is derived from Sanskrit Sulrive and the Latin word Sulphurium. Sulfur is a yellow nonmetallic element that has no odor and no taste. Sulfur is a critical raw element that industrial nations use for certain processes…

    • 530 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Sulfur Chemistry

    • 468 Words
    • 2 Pages

    It is ‘thiazolidine-2,4-dione’ and not thiohydantoins as the reaction product of monosubstituted thioureas and chloroacetylchloride a a a a a The reaction products of monosubstituted phenylthioureas with chloroacetylchloride in a polyethylene glycol (PEG-400) medium and K2 CO3 as base/catalyst at an elevated temperature are exclusively thiazolidine-2,4-diones and not thiohydantoins as has been reported. The core unit thiazolidine-2,4-dione is essentially derived from chloroacetylchloride…

    • 468 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    The element I chose is Sulfur. Sulfur’s symbol is S, and it’s in the Chalcogen family. Sulfur has a lot of roles to play in our bodies. It’s also one of the abundant elements in our bodies with a mass percentage of 0.2. Sulfur’s atomic number is 16, and its Mass number is 32.066. In addition, Sulfur is a non-metal. Sulfur has multiple physical and chemical properties; one of the physical properties is that Sulfur is insoluble in water. A chemical property for Sulfur is that it’s a very reactive element…

    • 379 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    First of all, what is sulfur hexafluoride (SF6)? SF6 is a non-toxic, nonflammable and noncorrosive gas. SF6 has almost the same chemical properties of a noble gas and it does not react with other materials. Under standard conditions, SF6 is colorless and odorless gas in high electrical components. Furthermore, SF6 also inhibits surface erosion and oxidation. It has high partial vapor pressure at both normal and low temperatures. SF6 also has an excellent heat transfer. Its high molecular weight and…

    • 2072 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    FACTORS AFFECTING SULFUR MINERALIZATION Sulfur content of organic matter Mineralization of sulfur depends on the sulfur content of the decomposing material in much the same way that nitrogen mineralization depends on the nitrogen content. Smaller amounts of S042- are liberated from low sulfur containing residue, which is similar to nitrogen mineralization. At or below a C/S ratio of approximately 200/1 only mineralization of sulfur occurs. Source of mineralizable sulfur Because of the contribution…

    • 497 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Bacteria are often maligned as the causes of human and animal disease (like this one, Leptospira, which causes serious disease in livestock). However, certain bacteria, the actinomycetes, produce antibiotics such as streptomycin and nocardicin; others live symbiotically in the guts of animals (including humans) or elsewhere in their bodies, or on the roots of certain plants, converting nitrogen into a usable form. Bacteria put the tang in yogurt and the sour in sourdough bread; bacteria help to break…

    • 812 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Mustard gas was possibly first invented by Cesar-Mansuete Despretz in 1822, but as he never mentioned any kind of irritation, it is doubtful. The final formula was actually created by the British Hans Thatcher Clarke, that worked with the Germans, as he modified the original one adding different chemicals. It was supposed to work as a poison, but one day when one of his test tubes broke and caused him 3rd degree burns all along his right arm. Effects The gas causes severe irritation that produces…

    • 275 Words
    • 1 Page
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Naming Chemical Compounds PART A Name the following 1 S Sulfur 2 Sb Antimony 3 N2 Dinitrogen 4 PO43- Phosphate 5 Au Gold 6 Rb Rubidium 7 LiCl Lithium Cloride 8 AlBr3 Aluminum (III) Bromide 9 KMnO4 Potassium Manganate (VII) 10 Cu(OH)2 Copper (II) Hydroxide 11 FeSO4 Iron (II) Sulfate 12 NH4Cl Ammonium Chloride 13 ZnCO3 Zinc Carbonate 14 SnF2 Tin (II)Fluoride 15 MgSO4 Magnesium Sulfate 16 MnO2 Manganese (IV) Oxide 17 Ca3(PO4)2 Tricalcium Phosphate 18 NaOH Sodium Hydroxide…

    • 442 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays