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Suicide Assessment

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Suicide Assessment
First and foremost, Harrington & Daughetee (2014) stress the importance of knowing how I as a counselor feel about suicide. Competencies include knowledge and attitudes towards suicide as well as knowing if this client is a low, medium, or high risk, based on assessments (Harrington & Daughetee, 2014). My instinctive reaction to suicide is that I would want to help prevent it, if possible. I can understand my need to prevent it, equally as I can empathize with a client wanting to end their life to stop the pain. I can remain nonjudgmental and have authentic concern towards the client. According to the Association of Suicidology (2015) one person every twelve minutes committed suicide in 2014. As a counselor, I must take the client’s statement at face value and assess the client’s current mental status and his spiritual beliefs (Harrington & Daughetee, 2014). An assessment needs to measure his current mood and suicidal symptoms. A challenge to an assessment with this client is the lack of a therapeutic relationship however, suicide assessment should begin with the first session (Harrington & Daughetee, 2014). Since this client has expressed the desire to commit suicide, my first question should be “Have you ever attempted suicide?” followed by “Have you lost someone close to suicide?” If he should answer “yes” to either question, I should follow with several questions that address …show more content…
1. What is his current level of depression or history of?
2. Does he use alcohol or drugs?
3. Does he have a suicide plan?
4. Has he made any previous attempts as suicide?
5. Does his plan include a lethal weapon as in drugs or firearms?
6. Does he experience isolation or lack of support?
7. Does he feel hopeless?
8. He is a male, is he an older male?
9. What is the history of family or friends who have committed suicide?
10. Is he employed?
11. What is his relationship

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