Preview

Sugar And Slave Trade

Good Essays
Open Document
Open Document
1100 Words
Grammar
Grammar
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Writing
Writing
Score
Score
Sugar And Slave Trade
In today’s society, sugar is just another product that is used daily but what we don’t know is the bad side of sugar. Sugar was the product that created the slave trade. It was an addiction to people and a nightmare for slaves. It caused a lot pain and killing but it also brought sweet taste in food. Sugar comes from a crop called sugar cane. Sugar can is a native crop to Polynesia and later on moved to China and India. It was widely used in India and in China sugar cane was chewed during 1000 B.C. Three hundred years later India started to make sugar cane into sugar and introduce it to China. Europe didn’t found out about sugar until the middle ages. But before sugar cane was distilled and crystalized and made into sugar, honey was the first …show more content…
It was mercantilism of the Triangular Trade that led to abolition of slavery. There are four reasons that show how slavery was abolished. The first one was Triangular trade was a mature and staple trade, so clever money didn’t last long in mature trades. This caused clever money and traders to use other routes that weren’t the Triangular Trade. The second reason was Britain controlled seas after Trafalgar. No slaves or sugar could pass by without the permission of the Royal Navy. The third reason was no one knew whether sugar was produced cheaply by slaves or by free blacks. Bankers who were Quakers thought free blacks were cheaper to use. The last reason was war which led reform to overcome resistance. All of these reason help abolish …show more content…
The British and Dutch could have used oxen rather than men, brain rather than brawn and the feudal system. The reason the British and the Dutch didn’t use the feudal system was because it was old fashioned. This is important because so many African-American lives could have been saved.
• Another thing that I didn’t know before reading this chapter that I think is important is how the United States guaranteed to buy every ton of sugar that Cuba could produce during World War II. They kept on buying their sugar until 1950 when the worldwide shortage was over. This caused Cuba the economic stagnation which then led to the whole problem with Fidel Castro. I think this is important because it shows one reason how Cuba became a dictatorship.
• The last thing that I didn’t know before reading this chapter that I think is important is how sugar was made from beets and carrots. Andrew Sgismond a student at the Berlin Academy discovered that there was sugar in carrots, parsnips and sea beets. I think this is important because it was Napoleon who found Andrew studies and started using this method of selecting and crossing to create sugar in France and not to depend on Britain (Royal Navy) for

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    The economic influences that forced the hand of slavery were over goods. The goods that were in high demand were sugar and tobacco. It has been argued that if it wasn’t for the high demand of these products especially more than anything else sugar the slave trade might not have been as astronomical as it was.…

    • 484 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Who dove the sugar Trade? I ask myself that question because I think I know the answer. I think the British drove the Sugar Trade. Everything during the Sugar Trade, the British almost had something involved with it. The reasons why the British drove the Sugar Trade was because of the demanding, the capital, and all of the trading.…

    • 288 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Sweetness and Power

    • 3974 Words
    • 16 Pages

    With such an obsession with sweet foods, there is an obvious desire for an explanation of how such a once unknown substance took center stage on everybody’s snack, dessert, and candy list. That’s where Sidney W. Mintz comes into play. He decided to write this book Sweetness and Power, and from the looks of all the sources he used to substantiate his ideas and data, it seems that he is not the first person to find the role that sugar plays in modern society important. By analyzing who Mintz’s audience is meant to be, what goals he has in writing this book, what structure his book incorporates, what type,…

    • 3974 Words
    • 16 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Sugar Trade

    • 937 Words
    • 3 Pages

    “Give me some sugar!” When most people hear that phrase, it usually means someone wants a kiss. But in the late 1600s and early 1700s, people want to plant sugar. True, it started some 9000 years ago in New Guinea, but it took a while before the rest of the world caught on. During this time, there was a movement called the sugar trade. Although there were many forces driving the sugar trade, what mainly drove it were the ideal land masses for sugar production, the amount of slaves needed, and the demand for it.…

    • 937 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    APUSH SLAVERY FRQ

    • 813 Words
    • 4 Pages

    The founding of the majority of American colonies was either for an economic profit or for religious freedom. To make the colonies founded for an economic profit, a large work force was needed. For many religious colonies that turned into huge economic powers, they used the Protestant work ethic. Other colonies decided to use indentured servants originally, but this ended up turning into a large use of slaves for their work force in some colonies. Despite slavery in Britain’s North American colonies originally pertaining to only the economic aspects of the society, it actually developed into an essential part of society and it was maintained for racial, social, and economic reasons. Slaves were used economically because they were cheap labor. Socially, it was respectable in some colonies to be a slave owner. Minorities were thought of lesser people by the whites, so slavery also showed racial superiority. This essay will discuss the racial, social, and economic reasons for the development of slavery in Britain’s North American colonies from 1607-1776.…

    • 813 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Sugar Trade DBQ

    • 820 Words
    • 3 Pages

    The rise of absolute monarchies in Western Europe during the 1400’s brought a new economic theory called mercantilism. In mercantilism countries desired a favorable balance of trade, in which raw materials were imported from their own colonies, manufactured, and then exported. After the discovery of the Americas, cane sugar was introduced to the West Indies and became a prominent plantation cash crop. From that time sugar trade remained part of the global economy. In the era of 1492 to 1750 key factors such as favorable climate, demand for sugar, and profit from the slave trade, drove the sugar trade to flourish.…

    • 820 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Land to grow the sugar crops was also easily accessible during the time of the sugar trade. Document 1 shows a map of the Caribbean and indicates who owned each piece of land at the time. Before the sugar trade, Europeans hadn’t utilized this land. This made it easy to acquire and use once sugar…

    • 821 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    I chose to abstain from sugar for the assignment. Sugar has been a part of my life ever since I could remember. All of my happy memories as a child included sugar and it is my go to when I feel overwhelmed, frustrated, or upset.…

    • 329 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The immediate addiction European citizens developed to the new sweetener drove the sugar trade between Europe and the Caribbean. In order to feed this addiction, slave labor in the Caribbean emerged, taking advantage of the islands which proved to be perfect for the growth of Europe’s newest drug. The population of Europe strongly desired sugar for sweetening imports, especially coffee, tea and chocolate. The citizens craved the sweet taste and demanded to be supplied with more of the drug. The price of slaves, the driving force behind the production of sugar, reflected this love of the sweetener, as the demand for sugar rose so did the price of slaves. But, as the price of slaves rose so did the price of owning and maintaining a sugar plantation…

    • 1046 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    The connection between sugar and slavery created chaos for millions of African people in the seventeenth and eighteenth century because the British viewed the Africans as inferior and the abolitionist played a key role by connecting sugar to slavery to abolish slavery. The British created a belief system based on the European superiority. According to the criteria that was set the Europeans to see the progression of a society, Europeans fall above the criteria because the rapid progression in their society and Africans fall below because they couldn’t make progress in their society. Therefore, Africans were viewed as uncivilized by the Europeans. Since Africans were uncivilized, it was justified for civilized Europeans to use them for their…

    • 203 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Agro Based Industries

    • 2432 Words
    • 10 Pages

    India has emerged as the largest sugar producing country in the world with a 15 per cent share of the world’s sugar production. However, the share in international trade of sugar is only 0.5 per cent.…

    • 2432 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Sugar Cane

    • 1810 Words
    • 8 Pages

    Sugar is used for various reasons. It is used to sweeten beverages and confectionery, bring out the tastes of canned…

    • 1810 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    The information that sugar is bad for you seems to be common knowledge. Where did this belief come from? One of the first books on the dangers of sugar was in 1972 by Dr. John Yudkin, a professor of Nutrition and Dietetics at the University of London. The book was called Pure, White and Deadly. In this book, Yudkin introduced the idea that sugar is dangerous. Yudkin stated that “if only a small fraction of what is already known about the effects of sugar were to be revealed in relation in any other material used as a food additive, that material would promptly be banned.” So, what does sugar actually do to…

    • 1407 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    India is the largest producer of sugar in the world and produces around 18.5 million tones of white plantation sugar per annum. Sugar industry is the second largest agro-processing industry in the country after cotton textiles with more than 600 operating sugar mills in different parts of the country.[ Indian sugar exim corporation: 2005]…

    • 2417 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    The writer was much surprised when the topic failure of the B.W.I sugar came up in class as part of her C.S.E.C studies. She then decided that this was form the basis of investigation for her history SBA. The writer strongly believes that it was neglect on the constant use of outdated technology that led to the ultimate demise of sugar across the region and she intends to highlight this via SBA.…

    • 261 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays