top-rated free essay

Student

By Rombor Dec 03, 2013 2985 Words

A RESEARCH
SUBMITTED IN FULFILLMENT OF
THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
TOPIC: IMPACTS OF SOCIAL NETWORKING TECHNOLOGY IN MMUST.

Contents
CHAPTER ONE6
INTRODUTION6
1.1 Background information6
1.2 Statement of problem7
1.3 Objectives of the study7
1.4 Significance of the study7
1.5 Hypothesis8
1.6 Research questions8
CHAPTER 2:8
LITERATURE REVIEW8
CONCLUSION10
Recommendations11

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Chapter 1:
INTRODUCTION
Background information
Problem statement
Objectives of the study
Research questions
Hypotheses
Significance of study

Chapter 2:
Literature Review.
Chapter 3:
Research Design and methodology.
Chapter 4:
Conclusion. 
CHAPTER ONE
INTRODUTION
1.1 Background information
The research was stimulated by the impacts of social networking technology in MMUST and other universities in Kenya. The research will be carried out through questionnaires and interviews in the respective universities starting from MMUST. The research therefore tries to explain, to examine the roles and recommends some measures to be put in place to improve on the negative effects of social network infrastructure various learning institution in Kenya.  

1.2 Statement of problem
Has Social Networking affected in any way the students and the various departments of an institution especially MMUST which is my case study?

1.3 Objectives of the study
1. To find out some of the effects of social network media in the education sector as from recent past in Masinde Muliro University, Kakamega county. 2. To seek possible measures to be put in place to cap the negative effects of social networking in the education sector. 3. To establish the number of institutions in Kenya which uses networking technology as part of their day to day activities. 4. To determine the procedure followed in acquiring network equipments like routers and other accessories to make networking fully functional in public universities.

1.4 Significance of the study
Networking is of great importance in the education sector in Kenya and other private Institutions. This is because it will be used to assist improve effectiveness of an institution through wired or wireless information sharing and other computer peripherals. By knowing the effects social networking especially in the education sector students and other stakeholders in an institution can channel their views straight without fear in realtime.

1.5 Hypothesis
1. The effects of social networking to the education sector as from the recent past in MMUST, Kakamega county are approaching more towards the positive side than the negative side. 2. Putting security measures such as controlled network access to other sites which kills the morals of the students is a way to curb the negative effects of social network media in many public universities. 3. The ratio of institutions using networking infrastructure Kenya to that which do not use them is about 5:1.

CHAPTER 2:
LITERATURE REVIEW
A social network is a configuration of people connected to one another through interpersonal means, such as friendship, common interests or ideas(Coyle & Vaughn, 2008, p.13). Social network exist because humans are societal and require relationships with other Humans in order to survive(Coyle & Vaughn, 2008, p.13). Social networks are also critical to the psychological well-being of humans; this has been well documented throught the years and is still interesting to researchers today (R A social network is a configuration of people connected to one another through interpersonal means, such as friendship, common interests, or ideas (Coyle & Vaughn, 2008, p. 13). Social networks exist because humans are societal and require relationships with other humans in order to survive (Coyle & Vaughn, 2008, p. 13). Social networks are also critical to the psychological well-being of humans; this has been well documented throughout the years and is still interesting to researchers today (Rheingold, 1993/2000, p. 321). Survey Research shows that an overwhelming majority of respondents report forming personal relationships online (Coyle & Vaughn, 2008, p. 13). “Internet time” – the furious pace of change in digital culture—compresses the timelines of events (Rheingold, 1993/2000, p. 335). Research shows that college student’s primary reasons for using communication technologies is convenience, ease of use, privacy if there were other people in the room, and the ability to multitask by engaging in multiple things, such as watching television (Quan-Haase, 2008, p. 108). In another study done in Hong Kong, the primary motivations of university students for using communication technologies were to express affection, being sociable by thanking people, helping friends, and expressing encouragement (Quan-Haase, 2008, p. 109). While using communication technologies and the Internet, college students report that they communicate primarily with friends from home and on campus (Quan-Haase, 2008, p 106). One of the more popular methods of communication among college students is a website titled Facebook, where college students use the website to stay linked with people with whom they used to be more closely involved with, e.g., former classmates and newer classmates (Coyle & Vaughn, 2008, p. 16). Research shows that college students who use communication technologies communicated considerably far more with peers than with relatives, suggesting a generation gap in the adoption of the digital age (Quan-Haase, 2008, p. 107). With college students leaving their homes and sometimes traveling far distances to schools, geographical distance reduces both communication frequency and psychological closeness with high school friends and family (Quan-Haase, 2008, p. 108). With an increase in distance, opportunities for meaningful interaction through conversation, persuasion, and sharing of experiences decrease as well does closeness to old friends and family members (Quan-Haase, 2008, p. 108). Studies report social ties that are maintained through e-mail, instant messaging, or social networking sites, such as Facebook and Myspace, show greater closeness than ties maintained via the telephone and in person (Quan-Haase, 2008, p. 109). College students are aware of the importance of in-person meetings for the maintenance of social ties, but communication technologies gives college students a sense of connectedness and allows students to share experiences with one another as if they were meeting face-to-face (Selwyn, 2007, p. 87). As Kollock and Smith (1999/2005) have pointed out, “Community is now conceptualized not in terms of physical proximity but in terms of social networks. Telephones, automobiles, and airplanes have long meant that it was possible to establish and sustain important social relationships outside of one’s immediate physical neighborhood” (para. 3). Now, in online interaction, the experience is something like attending a cocktail party and only being able to see people who are actively speaking, while the room and all the listeners are invisible (Kollock & Smith, 1999/2005). Critics with dystopian views state that with a loss of strong bonds among members in society, the Internet will limit connections between central and peripheral actors in society and those on the peripheral structure will be less connected than ever before (Fisher, 2001, p. 24). Fisher (2001) also notes that critics with utopian views state, “Cyberspace will make it easier for people to communicate both politically and otherwise” (p. 24). Workman (2008) states that most “student affairs professionals and sociologists have worried that the trend would lead to a population of students who were isolated and unable to develop healthy “offline” relationships” (p. 7). Research further suggests that online interactions do not necessarily remove people from their offline world but may indeed be used to support relationships and keep people in contact, even when life changes move people away from each other (Workman, 2008, p. 7). Rheingold (1993/2000) argues that, “virtual communities may actually be part of the remedy for the loss of live community” (p. 275).

CONCLUSION

As this review shows, research focusing on communication technology use among university and college undergraduates is necessary because applying knowledge to the subject will show the changing characteristics of individual relationships. The Internet is now taking over as a communication tool that is more convenient than meeting in a face-to face environment for college students. Students can use communication technologies to still achieve a sense of connectedness with former high school friends and family back home. Research in this area also suggests that virtual interaction may be a remedy for the loss of live community. One era is coming to a close and the rising of a new era is coming. Further study will show as technologies continue to advance, the students’ relationships will change alongside it. This study will focus on the growing use of communication technologies and look at the question of “How are communication technologies re-shaping individual relationships among college undergraduates?” To answer this question, it will require broad, open-ended feedback from samples collected because individual viewpoints about their own relationships are likely to be too complex for researchers. These responses have to come from college undergraduates, and it is not necessary to single any particular group out, so the undergraduates can be either male or female and the ethnicity of the undergraduate can be from all backgrounds. For these reasons, it is appropriate to use a qualitative research approach. Sample For this study, the availability/convenience and intensive interviewing sampling methods will be the most appropriate because it will be used to focus on the Internet use and relationships of the specific sample such as college undergraduates either male or female and ethnicity from all backgrounds. There will be no need to generalize the results to the whole population since the study is focused on just college undergraduates. Moreover, non-probability sampling methods are considered easier and less costly to use (Schutt, 2004). To get an adequate number of participants, the researchers will be able to wait for undergraduates around campus in places such as school unions, outside of buildings and outside of college dormitories. The availability/convenience method is used to select participants because they are available and easy to find (Schutt, 2004). In a few ways it can be difficult to get a solid sampling frame, such as mailing list or email lists, focused on college undergraduates because of universities privacy laws. However, by walking around a college campus, researchers will encounter enough

Recommendations
The strategies adopted by the researchers and other esteemed partners sampled in this study and their lessons learned leads us to suggest the following guidelines and recommendations for developing a social media strategy:

1. Establish clear objectives: Distinguish between increasing reach and awareness and expanding the scope of messages (collaborative, iterative message development).
2. Know your target audiences, where they are “present” online and what key behaviours they engage in (understand the cultural norms of each platform): (e.g., youth are currently more likely to Twitter; women between the ages of 25-35 are likely to be posting to Facebook daily).

3. Design campaigns for longevity and/or have exit strategies and clear archiving processes: Material from social media campaigns can “live forever” online and can reappear in circulation years after the campaign ends. It is important to consider date-stamping or providing explicit local and temporal context to information in order to prevent users in the future from using dated information that may no longer be appropriate.

26
4. Determine Resource Needs: For many platforms that require daily monitoring and responses (e.g., Facebook, Twitter) it is important to allocate sufficient time and resources for ongoing interactions.

5. Determine an Agency Content-Clearance Processes and / or Prepare Pre-approved Messaging Scripts: Some social media platforms require rapid clearance processes to enable real-time interactions with users (SecondLife, Twitter, Facebook) while immediate response are not critical on other platforms (YouTube).

6. Listen to online health discourse. Monitor the reception of campaign materials, and react to gaps, contradictory information or satirical responses to campaign materials. Both manual and automated infoveillance tools are available. Most platforms have freely available analytic tools, news aggregators and fee-for-service infoveillance monitoring is available. 7. Encourage or sponsor research investigating social media applications and specific health objectives.

8. Encourage coordination of materials and messages with municipal, provincial and federal agencies (share resources and leverage national-level campaigns). Consider incorporating high quality content from existing campaigns. Integrating popular and high quality materials from other public health agencies will not only leverage existing public health resources but through cross-linking and redirecting of traffic can improve the visibility of high-quality of information online and through reverse traffic flow, improve your own agency’s visibility. As research and experience with diverse social media platforms grows, it is likely that a more fine-grained typology will emerge to describe the distinct capabilities of each platform and the utility for specific public health interventions. There is a trend toward platform convergence, indicating that engaging with social media should be thought of as a complex and inter-related system: Twitter feeds direct traffic to YouTube, widgets enable connectivity to Facebook, and social bookmarking or aggregators transform users’ interface with the web and with mobile devices (32). Researchers are exploring opportunities to measure the impact of social media campaigns through user surveys conducted over Facebook, Twitter, or other platforms but more intervention research is critically needed.

CHAPTER 3
RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

3.1 RESEARCH APPROACH
The study will use qualitative and qualitative approaches to collect data. This is because the study has to capture descriptive and statistical data hence a clear and a comprehensive research will be drawn. 3.2 RESEARCH DESIGN

The study establishes the effects that social networking has posed on the service delivery to the institution of Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology. An improved and secure network infrastructure within the institution of MMUST would see an improved service delivery, and a poor networking system would diminish the service delivery too. By this dependence, the research is a correlational study that examines the extent to which differences in the networking technology properties would affect the service delivery. 3.3 RESEARCH SITE

The research will be conducted at MMUST as the case study.

3.4 RESEARCH POPULATION
In this research study, the target population is the students, lectures and staff and non-staff members of Masinde Muliro University of science and technology. Accessible group goes towards the students, lectures and technicians in the Computer Science department.

3.5 SAMPLE POPULATION
The research therefore relied on information given by:
Students from computer science department.
Lectures of computer science department and some other departments which appreciates use of Information techology. •Lab Technicians from computer laboratories.

3.8 DATA ANALYSIS
Codes will be assigned to each of the respondents. The information obtained will then be represented graphically using bar graph ad pie charts based on their respective year of study. A key will be provided to enhance clear interpretation of the graph and charts.

3.9 TRUSTWORTHNESS
The research will be organized at every stage. The researcher will take time to confirm findings from the study in-line with respondent’s responses the questions as provided in appendix.

APPENDICES

APPENDIX 1: QUESTIONNAIRE

SECTION A: STUDENT QUESTIONS

1.Which academic year are you in?
SecondThirdForth

2.Are you aware of the availability of networking technology in MMUST? YesNo

If yes, how is it important to the institution?
……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 3.Have you ever used any of the social network platforms?
YesNo

If yes, for what reason(s)?
……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 4.Where do you normally access internet with ease to visit this social sides?

LibraryHostelLecture halls

5.What are the problems you normally face while using the university wireless?. ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 6.What are the challenges you normally face while surfing on Mmust wireless? …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

7.What are the available remedies to this problems?
………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

8.Are you always being assisted when there is surfing problem? Yes No

SECTION B: LECTURER/STAFF ONLY

1.How many times have you had problems while using MMUST wireless to visit any site? Rare often Never

Give reasons for your answer
…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

APPENDIX 2: RESEARCH STUDY TIME SCHEDULE
This is a structure showing the time frame under which the research study will be conducted.

MAIN ACSUB ACTIVITYDURATION
Research topicDeveloping a research topic and objectives.2 days ApprovalRequesting for permission from the department to conduct the research 1 day Research preparationIdentifying the sample population, instruments to be used in the study. Designing, questions of the questionnaire.

Preparation of questionnaire questions and time schedule
5 days
Data collectionOrientation of respondents to the question
Administering questionnaire.
Observation period to be undertaken.
3 days
Data analysisCompiling data collected and making conclusions.5 days

References
1. Statistics Canada. Characteristics of Users using the Internet [Internet]. 2009 [cited 2010 Aug 13]. Statistics Canada, CANSIM, tables 358-0123, 358-0124, 358-0125 and 358- 0126. Available from: http://www40.statcan.gc.ca/l01/cst01/comm35a-eng.htm. 2. Statistics Canada. Canadian Internet Use Survey. [Internet]. 2009 [cited 2010 Aug 13]. Available from: http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/100510/dq100510a-eng.htm. Last modified 2010-06-29.

3. Statistics Canada. Internet use by individuals, by type of activity. [Internet] 2009 [cited 2010 Aug 13]. Statistics Canada, CANSIM, table 358-0130. Available from; http://www40.statcan.gc.ca/l01/cst01/comm29a-eng.htm. Last modified: 2010-05-10. 4. Lewis, R. The results are in. TechVibes. [Internet] 2009 [cited 2010 Aug 13]. Available from: http://www.techvibes.com/blog/social-media-survey-the-results-are-in. 5. Leger Marketing Inc. Social media reality check. [Internet] 2009 [cited 2010 Aug 13]. Available from: http://www.newswire.ca/socialmediarealitycheck/ 6. Seeman, S. Web 2.0 and Chronic Illness: New Opportunities, New Horizons. Healthcare Quarterly 2007; 6(3): 104-110.

7. Hudson, M., 2010. Web 2.0 & Social Media; Lessons Learned IPAC June 17, 2010. [Internet] 2010 [cited 2010 Aug 13]. Available from:
http://www.google.ca/#hl=en&q=hudson+social+media+lessons+learned+ppt&aq=f&aqi =&aql=&oq=&gs_rfai=&fp=e152ff60f580dc26.
8. Turnbull A, Summers A, Summers J, Gotta G, Beauchamp D, Klein, S, Kyzar K, Turnbull R, Zuna N. Fostering Wisdom-Based Action Through Web 2.0 Communities of Practice An Example of the Early Childhood Family Support Community of Practice. Infants & Young Children 2009; 22(1): 54–62.

9. Taubenheim AM, Long T, Smith EC, Jeffers D, Wayman J, Temple S. Using Social Media and Internet Marketing to Reach Women with The Heart Truth'. Social Marketing Quarterly 2008; 14(3): 58-67.
10. Eysenbach G. Medicine 2.0: Social networking, collaboration, participation, apomediation, and openness. Journal of Medical Internet Research 2008; 10(3), e22. 11. Scanfield D, Scanfeld V, Larson E. Dissemination of health information through social networks: Twitter and antibiotics. Am J Infect Control 2010; 38:182-8. 12. Keelan J, Pavri-Garcia V, Tomlinson G, Wilson K. 2007. Youtube as a source of information about immunization. JAMA. 2007; 298 (21): 2482-2484. 13. Beard L, Wilson K., Morra D, Keelan J. A survey of health-related activities on SecondLife. J Med Internet Res 2009;11(2):e17.

14. Keelan J, Pavri, V, Balakrishnan R, Wilson K. An analysis of the Human

Cite This Document

Related Documents

  • Student Cramming

    ...Effect of Student Cramming Behavior to Memory Retention of Basic Physics Concepts LL Abejuela, JC Gallardo, AI Silva, RL Gallega, DM Tabernilla, JR Tuates, and EA Florido Institute of Mathematics, Science, and Physics Physics division, University of the Philippines Los Baños Abstract This study aims to determine whether cra...

    Read More
  • Students Strikes

    ...STUDENTS STRIKES The purpose of this study was to investigate the management of secondary school students' unrest and the responses of school managers in the light of the causes of students' strikes in Machakos District. . This study sought to find out the causes of strikes and the response of the school managers, and their effect on the manage...

    Read More
  • Student Involvement

    ...shows that out of 71 students only 43 of them have ever thought of being in an organization. Many of the organizations in the School of Business have never even been heard of by the respondents. Many of the students feel that being involved could be valuable to them in the future. But due to a variety of factors the most prevalent one being a...

    Read More
  • Analysis on Student Consumption Habit

    ...The Analysis Of The Consumption Habit Of University Students 1. Introduction Consumption is an important part of the daily life. University students, as a special consumer group, have irreplaceable effects on leading the consumption trend and improving the consumption structure. Also, their characteristics of consumption and consumption sta...

    Read More
  • What Important Features Affect College Students’ Intention on Using Sina Weibo.

    ...DIVISION OF BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT Business Research Method The Research Proposal For What Important Features Affect College Students’ Intention on Using Sina Weibo. Business Research Method –/ECON – 5 Content Abstract ---------------------------------------------------------------------------...

    Read More
  • Adaptability level of former education students who were advised to shift

    ... CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION After graduation most high school students have to face dilemmas about the future. They ask themselves, “What happens after graduation?”Dilemmas that they must be able to succumb immediately. But that’s not the end of it for them, the hardest question about going to college is, “What course do you want to ta...

    Read More
  • Responding to the Challenges Experienced by Working Adult Students

    ...Working Adult Students at Paññasāstra University of Cambodia: A Pilot Study Susan Hagadorn, EdD, MPA Faculty of Education Pannasastra University of Cambodia susanhpuc@yahoo.com September 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS Abstract . . . . . . . . . 3 Introduction . . . . . . . . 3 Conceptual Context . . . . . . . 7 Rese...

    Read More
  • Emotional Intelligence of Students

    ...Mental Health Programme for College Students – An Experiment. Dr. Kirti Matliwala Lecturer Bhagwan Mah...

    Read More

Discover the Best Free Essays on StudyMode

Conquer writer's block once and for all.

High Quality Essays

Our library contains thousands of carefully selected free research papers and essays.

Popular Topics

No matter the topic you're researching, chances are we have it covered.