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Unit Outline 2013 Faculty of Business, Government & Law

Leadership, Innovation & Change

7075

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This Unit Outline must be read in conjunction with: a) UC Student Guide to Policies, which sets out University-wide policies and procedures, including information on matters such as plagiarism, grade descriptors, moderation, feedback and deferred exams, and is available at (scroll to bottom of page) http://www.canberra.edu.au/student-services b) UC Guide to Student Services, and is available at (scroll to bottom of page) http://www.canberra.edu.au/student-services c) Any additional information specified in section 6h.

1:
1a 1b 1c 1d 1e 1f

General Information
Unit title Unit number Teaching period and year offered Credit point value Unit level Unit Convener and contact details Dr Michael de Percy
Senior Lecturer in Political Science My details: My blog: www.politicalscience.com.au About me: See www.expertguide.com.au My office: Room 11B29 Faculty of Business, Government & Law University of Canberra ACT 2601 Australia Tel: +61 (0)2 6201 2708 Fax +61 (0)2 6201 5239

LEADERSHIP, INNOVATION & CHANGE
7075 Semester 2, 2013 3 2

1g

Administrative contact details

Tel: +61 (0)2 6206 8810 Fax: +61 (0)2 6201 5764 Room: Level B Reception, Building 11 Email: BGLAdminEnquiries@canberra.edu.au Web: http://www.canberra.edu.au/faculties/business

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2:
2a

Academic Content
Unit description and learning outcomes

Description Leadership is an area of critical interest in today's rapidly changing, international business environment. There has seldom been a time when leadership was more challenging or more important. To be a leader, one has to make a difference and facilitate positive changes. Leaders inspire and stimulate others to achieve worthwhile goals. This unit considers contemporary approaches to leadership, innovation and change from the philosophical perspective that leadership skills can be taught. To this end, the unit examines case studies and relevant theoretical perspectives and encourages critical self-reflection.

Learning Outcomes
On completing this unit, students will have acquired:
      

An understanding of the theory and practice of leadership An understanding of leadership in the Australian and international context Knowledge of how to enhance leadership skills An understanding of the relationship between entrepreneurship and leadership Knowledge of entrepreneurship in business, government and civil society Knowledge of innovative types of organisation The capacity to undertake projects requiring research, analysis and the effective communication of the results

2b

Generic Skills

This unit focuses particularly on the generic skills and attributes of written communication, analysis and inquiry, working independently and with others and professionalism and social responsibility. Details of the generic skills and attributes which graduates of the University of Canberra are expected to obtain are available here: http://www.canberra.edu.au/uclearning/learning-support/uc-graduate-attributes..

2c

Prerequisites and/or co-requisites

Introduction to Management or permission of unit convener.

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3a

Delivery of Unit and Timetable
Delivery mode
This unit is delivered in face-to-face (F2FO) and online (ONL) modes. Students must enrol in the mode of their choice via MyUC. Details for each mode are provided on the unit Moodle site. Assessment items are based on the following: 1. An individual academic essay designed to assess your knowledge and understanding of leadership theories; 2. A group essay designed to assess your teamwork skills and knowledge of innovation and leadership; and 3. Regular quizzes to assess your breadth of knowledge of the key concepts and issues taught in this unit.

3b

Schedule of lectures and tutorials by week
Week 1 Activity Developing the leadership “attitude” (face-to-face and online) F2FO: Face to face lecture (video recorded), no tutorials ONL: Video-recorded lecture, no online discussion Essential reading: As per Moodle Week 2 Activity How do we know *what* makes a leader? (online only) F2FO: Tutorials as per timetable: Introductions & administration ONL: Online discussions as per Moodle: Introductions & administration Essential reading: As per Moodle Week 3 Activity Styles, situations & contingencies (online only) F2FO: Tutorials as per timetable: Researching & referencing workshop ONL: Online discussions as per Moodle: Researching & referencing workshop Essential reading: As per Moodle Week 4 Activity Becoming a leader (online only) F2FO & ONL: Moodle Quiz (10%) No tutorials, no online discussions Essential reading: As per Moodle Week 5 Activity Leading. Strategically. (online only) F2FO & ONL: Individual Academic Essay Due (30%) No tutorials, no online discussions Essential reading: As per Moodle

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Week 6

Activity Leading. Self. (online only) F2FO: Tutorials as per timetable ONL: Online discussions as per Moodle Essential reading: As per Moodle

Week 7

Activity Leading. Others. (online only) F2FO & ONL: Moodle Quiz (10%) No tutorials, no online discussions Essential reading: As per Moodle

Week 8 Week 9

Activity Mid-Term Break (class free period). No lectures, no tutorials, no online discussions. Activity Creativity (online only) F2FO: Tutorials as per timetable ONL: Online discussions as per Moodle Essential reading: As per Moodle

Week 10

Activity Leadership=Entrepreneurship=Leadership? (online only) F2FO & ONL: Moodle Quiz (10%) No tutorials, no online discussions Essential reading: As per Moodle

Week 11

Activity Leading. Globally. (online only) F2FO & ONL: Group Essay Due (30)% No tutorials, no online discussions Essential reading: As per Moodle

Week 12

Activity Leading by design (online only) F2FO: Tutorials as per timetable ONL: Online discussions as per Moodle Essential reading: As per Moodle

Week 13

Activity Leading: “I love change” (online only) F2FO & ONL: Moodle Quiz (10%) No tutorials or online discussions Essential reading: As per Moodle

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Week 14

Activity F2FO & ONL: No lectures, not tutorials, no online discussion

4:
4a

Unit Resources e-Text The set text for this unit is an e-text: Clawson, J.G. (2011). Level Three Leadership: Getting Below the Surface, 5th Edition, Prentice Hall. Details will be available on the Moodle site. However, a more expensive hardcopy version may be available from the Coop Bookshop on campus. Students are expected to bring their own notetaking equipment for use during lectures and tutorial activities. Students are welcome to bring electronic devices into the classroom. See Moodle.

4b

Materials and equipment

4c

Unit website

5:
5a

Assessment
Assessment overview

Performance evaluation and grading will be based on the submission of (1) an individual academic essay (designed to assess your knowledge of leadership theories); (2) a group essay (designed to assess your teamwork and knowledge of leadership and innovation); and the completion of (3) four Moodle Quizzes (to assess your knowledge of the key concepts and issues taught in this unit). To pass this unit, you MUST attempt and/or submit all assessment items AND obtain a mark of at least 50% overall. Failure to submit any assessment item or complete a Moodle Quiz automatically results in a fail grade for the unit. Unless an official extension is granted, assessment items must be submitted no later than one week after the due date to be counted as “submitted”. Assessment items submitted later than one week after the due date will not be regarded as “submitted” and therefore will not be marked. Assessment Item (Students MUST submit all items to pass this unit) Essay 1: Individual Academic Essay (1500 words, minimum 12 academic references) Essay 2: Group Essay (2000-2500 words) 4 x Moodle Quizzes Due Date of Assessment Items 5pm Friday Week 5 5pm Friday Week 11 Weeks 4, 7, 10 & 13 Weighting (100%) 30% 30% 40%

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5b

Details of each assessment item

Assessment Criteria This section is to be read in conjunction with section 6h: Additional Information. Assessment criteria includes the information provided in this unit outline, information provided in lectures, tutorials and online discussions (in particular the Week 2 lecture and tutorial and online classes), and the additional information provided at the end of this section. Failure to read this unit outline or to attend classes (or participate online) does not constitute grounds for special consideration or review of results. Students are expected to have the capacity and commitment to attend class or to actively participate in online discussions. Students who are unable to commit to attending classes should enrol in the online (ONL) mode for this unit. Individual Essay: There is one question, as follows: To what extent do leaders influence organisational effectiveness? In answering the question, demonstrate the application of leadership theories and concepts taught in the unit. Important Notice: A minimum of 12 different references is required for this essay. Be careful using the Internet - it offers information, sometimes wildly inaccurate, while also not necessarily providing a strong critical analysis. The use of encyclopaedia-style Web sources (e.g. http://www.wikipedia.org/ and www.thefreedictionary.com) is NOT acceptable at this level of study and any instance of using such references will attract a fail grade. To receive a Distinction grade or above, you will need to draw upon academic journals, texts and high-quality references, and exceed the minimum standards. Students must submit their academic essays in a Microsoft Word document electronically via Moodle. Essays submitted in any other format will not be marked and will receive a fail grade of zero. It is also required that essays include a list of references at the end of the essay (in alphabetical order by author surname) which is presented in a recognised Author/Date referencing system. This must be part of the essay document, not a separate file (see http://www.canberra.edu.au/library/research-gateway/research_help/referencing-guides). You MUST write in the third person for all assessment items in this unit. For example, rather than writing ‘In this essay, I discuss…’, write: ‘This essay will discuss…’. Writing in the third person is a formal writing skill which you must practise while undertaking this unit. If you do not write in the third person your essay will attract a fail grade. Group Essay The group essay focuses on leadership and innovation. The essay question is: Many popular leadership books focus on transformational leadership. Why are leaders expected to be able to transform organisations? Specific Instructions: 1. Groups: Form a group of no less than two (2) and no more than three (3) persons (from any tutorial class or mode). Individual contributions will not be marked – groups of two or three
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only - so choose your team early. 2. Word limit: Write an essay of between 2,000 and 2,500 words (do not go above or below the word limit). To determine your word count, highlight from the first word of the first sentence to the last word of the last sentence (this includes all quotes and in-text references), and use the Microsoft Word word-count function. 3. Teamwork: One of the principal objectives of this assignment is to develop teamwork - a necessary and highly valued component of modern leadership. Consequently, all group members are responsible for the performance of the group and the timely submission of the assignment. Issues such as leaving the group assignment until the last moment or poor performance by group members will not be considered reasonable grounds for extensions or special consideration. Moodle Quizzes There are four Moodle quizzes, one each in Weeks 4, 7, 10 and 13. The quizzes are designed to assess your knowledge of the key concepts taught in the unit, from all topics covered in the lectures, the tutorials, the online discussions, the readings from the e-text, and the unit website for the period before each quiz. You will have thirty (30) minutes to answer twenty (20) multiple choice questions in each quiz. Details will be provided in classes and discussions and on the Moodle site.

5c
Nil.

Special assessment requirements

5d

Supplementary assessment

Refer to the UC Supplementary Assessment Policy.

5e

Academic Integrity

Students have a responsibility to uphold University standards on ethical scholarship. Good scholarship involves building on the work of others and use of others’ work must be acknowledged with proper attribution made. Cheating, plagiarism, and falsification of data are dishonest practices that contravene academic values. The Academic Skills Centre provides opportunities to enhance student understanding of academic integrity.

5f

Text-matching software

Text matching software (Urkund) will be used in this unit to check for plagiarism. Students at Level 2 are expected to be conversant with the consequences of plagiarism. Before submitting your work for assessment, you are required to submit your work for checking by Urkund. Further instructions will be provided in class or via Moodle.

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6:
6a

Student Responsibility
Workload

The amount of time you will need to spend on study in this unit will depend on a number of factors including your prior knowledge, learning skill level and learning style. Nevertheless, in planning your time commitments you should note that for a 3cp unit the total notional workload over the semester or term is assumed to be 150 hours. These hours include time spent in classes. The total workload for units of different credit point value should vary proportionally. For example, for a 6cp unit the total notional workload over a semester or term is assumed to be 300 hours.

6b

Special needs

Students who need assistance in undertaking the unit because of disability or other circumstances should inform their Unit Convener or UC AccessAbility as soon as possible so the necessary arrangements can be made.

6c

Participation requirements

Students are expected to participate in all tutorials (face-to-face) or discussions (online) and to do the required readings before the commencement of each week. Students are expected to undertake the necessary reading and research for written assignments.

6d

Withdrawal

If you are planning to withdraw please discuss with your unit convener. Please see Withdrawal of Units for further information on deadlines.

6e

Required IT skills

Students must submit all work in the required electronic formats outlined in tutorial classes. Make it a habit to provide in-text references AND a list of references at the end of ANY assignments submitted while at university.

6f 6g

Costs Work placements or internships

Students are expected to purchase either the e-text or a hardcopy of the required textbook.

This unit focuses on fundamental scholarly skills and is designed to provide you with a solid introduction to the tools, attitude and confidence necessary for a successful learning experience while at university. Consequently, work placements or internships are not available in this unit.

6h

Additional information

Important Unit Rules
Unit Outline: This unit outline is a formal document and it is the student’s responsibility to read the document in its entirety. Students can avoid incorrectly submitting assessment items and other issues which may affect the student’s grade simply by reading this document. If you have
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any questions about the unit outline, ask your lecturer or tutor. Where to Submit Assignments: All assignments are to be submitted via Moodle as electronic Microsoft Word documents. Assignments submitted elsewhere or in other formats will be not submitted and will immediately attract a fail grade. Writing style: All written assignments are to be written in full prose, that is, full sentences using the generally-accepted academic essay format. Dot-points or numbered lists are NOT acceptable and written assignments with dot-points or numbered lists will achieve a lower grade. Referencing: All words taken from any source must be presented within quotation marks and acknowledged with a reference using a formal Author-Date referencing system. All written assignments are to include a reference list at the end of the assignment. A reference list is a list of the references actually cited in the essay, presented in alphabetical order by author surname. Dot points or numbered reference lists are not acceptable. Failure to follow this convention will result in a lower mark for the relevant assessment item. DO NOT use lecture notes or tutorial discussions as references for assessment items – you must undertake your own study and reference the main source. Use of lecture and tutorial discussions as references is unacceptable and may contribute to a lower mark for the relevant assessment item. Students are expected to look for material which is additional to the e-text in preparing their assessment items, and over-reliance on the e-text or the Internet for sources may reduce the marks awarded. Assessment Criteria: Assessment criteria are outlined in lectures, tutorials, online discussions and on the unit website. Sample essays at each grade level are provided to assist students to grasp the relevant standards. Additional information relating to assessment is outlined below: Grades: High Distinction: Work of outstanding quality on the learning outcomes of the unit, which may be demonstrated in areas such as criticism, logical argument, and interpretation of materials or use of methodology. This grade may also be given to recognise particular originality or creativity, provided the work follows academic conventions and is of a high academic standard. Distinction: Work of very good quality on the learning outcomes of the unit, demonstrating a sound grasp of content, together with efficient organisation and selectivity. Credit: Work of good quality showing more than satisfactory achievement on the learning outcomes of the unit, or work of very good quality on some of the learning outcomes of the unit. Pass: Work shows a satisfactory achievement of the learning outcomes of the unit. Fail: Work showing an unsatisfactory achievement of one or more learning outcomes of the unit. This may also include the student’s failure to follow instructions on submitting the essay, or normal academic conventions. Alternatively, a fail grade may be awarded where a student has relied upon non-academic Internet sources as major references, or not focused on the concepts taught in this unit. The following are indications of unsatisfactory achievements of the learning outcomes and generic skills:  poor grammar and sentence construction
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            

inadequate analytical structure not using theoretical concepts insufficient analysis using too many long quotes poor, incomplete referencing or not following accepted referencing protocols failing to answering the question failing to meet the word limit exceeding the word limit using non-academic references such as ‘Wikipedia’ using non-academic references such as dictionaries and encyclopaedia using ANY bullet points (you must ALWAYS write in full sentences) using ANY numbered lists (you must ALWAYS write in full sentences) not using a recognised referencing convention (this includes using bullet-points or number lists in the reference list – it must be presented in alphabetical order by author surname)

Additional criteria: In addition to the above, criteria used to assess your work will include:  Evidence of reading relevant material, including different points of view.  Evidence of understanding the essay question.  Discussion and critical analysis of relevant concepts, theories and issues.  Logical arrangement of material relevant to the question asked, reflecting understanding of the issues and the relationships between elements of the unit.  Use of relevant facts or empirical information to develop and substantiate critical analysis and argument.  Clarity and correctness of writing (e.g. grammar, punctuation including use of capital letters and spelling).  Proper referencing, acknowledgement and citation of sources - you must use a recognised Author/Date system of referencing. A list of references used in preparation for any written work is required, presented in alphabetical order by author surname. Moderation Procedures Appropriate moderation procedures are used in the setting and marking of assessment tasks. When a mark or grade is awarded that places the student in jeopardy of a Fail in the whole unit, more than one member of academic staff will be involved in the decision. Obtaining Advice on Assignments: Advice on written assignments can be obtained from Academic staff for specific advice on structure and content – do not expect the lecturers to read a draft of your essay Announcements at Lectures or on Moodle: Announcements made at lectures or on Moodle are deemed to be made to the whole group. The lecturer and tutors will not provide individual notices to students who have failed to attend scheduled classes or read discussion forums. Such information may be available on the unit website, but ultimately it is the student’s responsibility to attend lectures and tutorials or keep abreast of material provided online. Late Assignments and Extensions Policy: Late submissions will be penalised at the rate of 2 marks per day, including weekends. For
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example, an assignment that is worth 40% of the overall assessment, which is two days late and would have received a mark of 20/40 if it had been submitted on time, will be reduced to 16/40. Assessment items submitted one week (7 days) after the due date will be deemed “not submitted” and will not be marked. Assessment items deemed “not submitted” will result in an automatic fail of the unit overall. This policy will be strictly applied. Unless a written note from a health care or social service professional is submitted, marks will be deducted for late submissions of all assessment items. All requests for extensions must be made to the senior tutor via email before the submission time and must include a scanned copy of the relevant documentation. Sending an email to the senior tutor just before the submission deadline does not constitute the granting of an extension. Extensions will only be considered if medical certificates, letters from counsellors or other appropriate documentation are submitted with the request. Generally, assignment extensions will not be accepted after the submission deadline. Special consideration: Under no circumstances will special consideration be given to any student failing to follow the instructions presented in this Unit Outline or given during lectures, tutorials and/or online. Students requiring special consideration are to contact the Unit Convenor or the relevant authorities within the University well before the assessment submission deadline. Keep copies of your assignments: Students are to keep a separate copy of all assessment items that are submitted. This is the student’s responsibility and failure to do so will not constitute grounds for reassessment in any circumstances. Individual work and plagiarism: No tolerance: Work by students suspected of containing plagiarised content will be submitted to the Associate Dean (Education) of the Faculty for immediate investigation. It is taken for granted that assessment items give evidence of background reading, intelligent criticism, keen observation and the development of a line of argument to support any particular stance adopted. It is also assumed that, unless explicitly stated otherwise, each assignment is totally the work of the individual submitting it and is produced specifically for the unit AND the relevant semester in question. Plagiarism will not be tolerated. Any item of assessment deemed to include plagiarism by the Associate Dean (Education) will attract a fail grade for the unit overall, and, where deemed appropriate, will be followed by academic disciplinary proceedings. Good scholarship necessarily requires building on and borrowing from the work of others but this use must be acknowledged. Cheating, plagiarism, and falsification of data are dishonest practices that contravene academic values of respect for knowledge, scholarship and scholars. The appropriation by reproducing, paraphrasing, summarizing or otherwise presenting in altered form, of another person’s ideas or arguments without acknowledgement is plagiarism. Plagiarism includes submitting work prepared by another author, including another student, as one’s own.

7:

Student Feedback

All students enrolled in this unit will have an opportunity to provide anonymous feedback on the unit at the end of the Semester via the Unit Satisfaction Survey (USS) which you can access by logging into MyUC via the UC homepage: http://www.canberra.edu.au/home/. Your lecturer or tutor may also invite you to provide more detailed feedback on their teaching through an
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anonymous questionnaire.

8:

Authority of this Unit Outline

Any change to the information contained in Section 2 (Academic content), and Section 5 (Assessment) of this document, will only be made by the Unit Convener if the written agreement of Head of Discipline and a majority of students has been obtained; and if written advice of the change is then provided on the unit site in the learning management system. If this is not possible, written advice of the change must be then forwarded to each student enrolled in the unit at their registered term address. Any individual student who believes him/herself to be disadvantaged by a change is encouraged to discuss the matter with the Unit Convener.

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    John Marsden develops the theme of denial through the portrayal of the character’s experiences. Specifically Hamlet’s refusal to acknowledge his nocturnal rampage as well as his true feeling towards his father, Claudius not fully accepting that he murdered his brother and Gertrude denying her emotions and not accepting responsibilities in order to maintain her image. These events help to enhance the tragic nature of ‘Hamlet.’…

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    Student

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    Our group tried to target students and creators again. We increased sales and market shares to these two groups, and to the other four groups too. Student market share went from 34.7% in decision 3 to 44.7% in decision 4, Home Users went from 21.9% to 29.5%, Assistants went from 4.5% to 5.4%, Creators went from 20.4% to 24.5%, Managers went from 7.7% to 9.8%, and Parents went from 12.9% to 19.9%.…

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    student

    • 492 Words
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    “The lottery” is a story that begins describing a village. The first descriptions that took my attention were “flowers were blossoming profusely” and “the grass was richly green”. After describing the village it passes to what people are doing. It says that they are getting together for an event, which is the lottery. All the heads of the family, who were men, had to drawn for their family. This had been going since before the oldest man in the village was born. We don’t really know the reason of this lottery until we get to the part where Old Man Warner starts mocking the young people around the other villages, who had stopped doing the lottery. He says “Used to be saying about ‘Lottery in June, corn be heavy soon.’ This shows that that’s their tradition of getting heavier fields with corn, and their tradition was to stone one person for everyone else to be happy.…

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