States of Consciousness

Good Essays
States of Consciousness
PSY/202
June 5, 2013
Elise M. Vandamia, MS, LPC

CheckPoint: States of Consciousness There are various states of consciousness; the one that people spend the most time in is waking consciousness, the alert state that people are in when they are awake. Other times people are in another or altered state of consciousness. In the following, the four types of altered states of consciousness and their behaviors will be examined. The first and most common type is sleep. This altered state is controlled by the circadian rhythm, which is part of the human body’s biological rhythm. There are two theories of why humans sleep the adaptive theory that states that sleep patterns are evolved to avoid predators. The restorative theory states that sleep is necessary for the body to stay healthy. There are two types of sleep that a person will experience, Rapid Eye Movement (R.E.M.) where dreaming takes place and Non-R.E.M. which is more restful for the mind and body. A behavior that is associated with this altered state is sleep deprivation, which can result in serious health issues and affect mental performance (Pearson Learning Solutions, 2013). The second type, which is tied to sleep, is dreams. This altered state takes place during the R.E.M. type of sleep. A person can be in this altered state four to five times a night. A behavior that can be linked to this state is night terrors or nightmares that causes a person to awake suddenly and very afraid (Pearson Learning Solutions, 2013). The third type of altered state is hypnosis, where a person is susceptible to suggestion. As with sleep there is also two theories that try to explains this altered consciousness, first is disassociation, where the immediate consciousness of the mind is effect and the sub-consciousness is alert and aware. The second is social cognitive where the person is fully aware and is role-playing. An example of the use of hypnosis is pain relief, which the person’s

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    There are four main states of altered consciousness that differ from our normal state, sleep and dreams, hypnosis, biofeedback, and meditation. These states, while having identified them and having a general grasp of them, are still studied and observed to find out the definitive reason for why each and every one of them occur and what we can do with these states, whether it be medicinal or spiritual.…

    • 674 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Consciousness is being aware of what is going on around you and inside you. Many philosophers have struggled to understand consciousness. Now with greater technology in our hands we are able to understand it better. When you dream you are in an altered state of consciousness. Some people try to achieve the state of altered consciousness with drugs or more natural ways like meditation and hypnosis.…

    • 359 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Consciousness: awareness of the outside world and one’s own mental processes, thoughts, feelings, and perceptions…

    • 1112 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    What is counciousness

    • 415 Words
    • 2 Pages

    The two most widely accepted altered states are sleep and dreaming. Although dream sleep and non-dream sleep appear very similar to an outside observer, each is associated with a distinct pattern of brain activity, metabolic activity, and eye movement, each is also associated with a distinct pattern of experience and cognition. During ordinary non-dream sleep, people who are awakened report only vague and sketchy thoughts, and their experiences do not cohere into a continuous narrative. During dream sleep, in contrast, people who are awakened report rich and detailed experiences in which events form a continuous progression, which may however be interrupted by bizarre or fantastic intrusions. Thought processes during the dream state frequently show a high level of irrationality. Both dream and non-dream states are associated with severe disruption of memory: it usually disappears in seconds during the non-dream state, and in minutes after awakening from a dream unless actively refreshed.…

    • 415 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Sleep always includes several periods of dreaming. Dreams can be lucid dreams in which one is aware of the dream. Lucid dreaming exerts some degree of control and participation in the dream setting. As Rebecca points out, “lucid dreaming is the ability to become aware while you are dreaming- to consciously wake up inside the dream world and control your dreams” (1). This persuasive essay will prove to what extend lucid dreaming is feasible and the conditions of awareness that a dream must fulfill in order to be defined as a lucid dream.…

    • 1280 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Best Essays

    The term “Hypnosis” is difficult to precisely define. It comes from the Greek work “hypnos” which means sleep. However, it is helpful to provide one or two definitions to gain an understanding of its nature. According to Cambridge Dictionaries1 hypnosis is a “mental state like sleep, in which a person’s thoughts can be easily influenced by someone else”. Wikipedia, citing the Encyclopedia Britannica, 2004,2 also defines…

    • 2506 Words
    • 11 Pages
    Best Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    consciousness

    • 270 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Consciousness refers to your individual awareness of your unique thoughts, memories, feelings, sensations and environment. Your conscious experiences are constantly shifting and changing.…

    • 270 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Psy 201 Syllabus

    • 926 Words
    • 5 Pages

    * READING: Read Module 12: Sleep and Dreams & Module 13: Hypnosis and Meditation in Ch. 4 of Psychology and Your Life.…

    • 926 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    States of Consciousness

    • 303 Words
    • 2 Pages

    * There is no unconscious mind driven by repressed emotions and instinctive urges (Freud’s Id)…

    • 303 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Dreams

    • 2982 Words
    • 12 Pages

    involuntarily in the mind during certain stages of sleep. The purpose and meaning of the…

    • 2982 Words
    • 12 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Hypnosis can be traced as far back as the ancient Egyptians where it was used as a means of curing illnesses through suggestion, it was known as the curing sleep. Hypnosis can be described as a sleep like trance and a state of heightened relaxation, that hypnotists today call a trance state this is where you are more susceptible to suggestion and influence. Hypnosis can be used in many ways such as stage entertainment, therapy and as a means of investigation. For example Milton Erickson who is known as the father of modern hypnosis said “You use hypnosis not as a cure but as a means of establishing a favourable climate in which to learn.” (1 Erickson http://pfti.org/great-teachers/milton-erickson-2/milton-erickson-quotes/), this is a great way of looking at the use of hypnosis in therapy. Hypnosis is still very much clouded by scepticism and cynicism but in the last few years it has started to become more widely accepted and understood by the scientific community “in recent years, hypnosis has gained momentum and acceptance as part of the evolution of our health care system.” (2 Hadley + Staudacher – p7). During this essay I would like to explain the different aspects of hypnosis and how they affect the client, also the after effects of hypnosis and also how important these factors are to get the client into a trance state. I will also like to discuss the role of relaxation in hypnotherapy by looking at it from both the client’s point of view and the therapist’s point of view and also look at its role within the induction, pre and post hypnotic state. When looking at hypnosis there are two aspects, physical and psychological, both of which are the integral parts of hypnosis. Although the psychological aspect is more prominent the physical aspect of hypnosis also plays a big part during the whole process…

    • 2064 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Review

    • 779 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Let me clarify the points that were just mentioned a second ago. As you know, the number of patients suffering from depression, insomnia, and other mental conditions have increased drastically over the years. For some patients, medication just does not help them. So, hypnosis offers a different treatment. Continuing on that point,…

    • 779 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Best Essays

    Hypnosis, as a term and as a practice, is shrouded in centuries of mystery and surrounded by misconception. Even the word itself, derived from the Greek ‘hypnos’, meaning sleep, is misleading; most people today, even if they hadn’t experienced it themselves, would recognise that being in a hypnotic state is not the same as being asleep. In order to reach a satisfactory definition of hypnosis, it is necessary therefore to explore its origins, examine its physical and psychological effects, and perhaps explode a few myths along the way.…

    • 2461 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Best Essays
  • Good Essays

    Describe how altered states of consciousness related to sleep, psychoactive drugs, or meditation and hypnosis affect individuals with the disorder…

    • 548 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    My understanding of hypnosis is that it is a natural state and that all humans regularly enter a light trancelike state which they describe as “daydreaming”. It is not gaining control of a person so they act out of character and do outrageous things. This however is a common opinion of what hypnosis is.…

    • 1872 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Powerful Essays