Stanford Prison Experiment and Obedience

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Obedience to Our Parents
To be obedient is to obey the orders of one's elders and superiors. There cannot be order unless there is obedience. One has to obey the laws of the country, otherwise the society cannot exist. The laws may be irksome, but, for the overall good of the law one must obey them. For instance, the laws to be obeyed on the road ensures road safety. The laws pertaining to property help society continue without hitches and hindrances. Even in our body our limbs obey the commands of the brains unless they are diseased. Obedience is essential for the enforcement of order.

Obedience includes obedience to one's parents and elders. Parents are the best well wishers of their children. From their experience, they know what is good for their children. They would never mean ill for them. For the sake of the well being of the children, parents insist on obedience. Obedient children grow into fine children. They are not only loved by their parents but also by others connected with the household and by the neighbours.

It is our duty to obey our parents, that is, to do always what they tell us to do. All that we have is given to us by our parents food, clothing and education.
They tend us when we are too young to do anything for ourselves. They watch over us in times of sickness, provide for our amusement, teach us the principles of their religion, and guard us from evil influences.
Obedience is a very simple way of showing gratitude for these benefits. It is a way that is well within the reach of the young infant as well as the full-grown son.
Parents are not only the providers of benefits, but are the guides of their children in all the relations of life. There may be cases where a father and a mother prove themselves unworthy of their children’s regard; but it is usually found that parents are as solicitous for their children’s welfare as their own.
Being adults and having experience of the world, they are in a position to form better judgments

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