Stage 1 Sleep Research Paper

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Stage 1 sleep
Stage 1 sleep is experienced as falling to sleep and is a transition stage between wake and sleep. It usually lasts between 1 and 5 minutes and occupies approximately 2-5 % of a normal night of sleep. This stage is dramatically increased in some insomnia (restless legs) and disorders that produce frequent arousals such as apnea .
Stage 2 sleep
Stage 2 sleep follows stage 1 sleep and is the baseline of sleep. This stage is part of the 90 minute cycle and occupies approximately 45-60% of sleep.
Stage 3 and 4 or Delta sleep
Stage 2 sleep evolves into Delta sleep or slow wave sleep in approximately 10-20 minutes and may last 15-30 minutes. It is called slow wave sleep because brain activity slows down dramatically from the theta rhythm of stage 2 to a much slower rhythm of 1 to 2 cycles per second called delta and the height or amplitude of
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Composes 20-25 % of a normal nights sleep. Breathing , heart rate and brain wave activity quicken. Vivid Dreams can occur. Sleep Specialists call this 5th stage of sleep "REM" rapid eye movement sleep because if one is to watch a person in this stage, their eyes are moving rapidly about. After REM stage, the body usually returns to stage 2 sleep.
2) During sleep, the body cycles between non-REM and REM sleep. Typically, people begin the sleep cycle with a period of non-REM sleep followed by a very short period of REM sleep. Dreams can occur in any stage of sleep symptoms of REM sleep are Accelerated respiration Increased brain activity Eye movement Muscle relaxation Usually, REM sleep occurs 90 minutes after sleep onset. The first period of REM typically lasts 10 minutes, with each recurring REM stage lengthening, and the final one lasting an hour. Intense dreaming occurs during REM sleep as a result of heightened brain activity, but paralysis occurs simultaneously in the major voluntary muscle groups Most dreaming takes place during

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