Springs- Hookes Law Lab

Topics: Force, Elasticity, Mass Pages: 7 (496 words) Published: November 3, 2013
Lab 5.3
SPRINGS- HOOKES LAW

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Lab 5.3

SPRINGS- HOOKES LAW

Purpose:

To study the characteristics of a spring.

Hypothesis:

With an increase in weight there will be a directly relatable increase in spring length. Additionally each spring will increase to different expected lengths.

Materials:

-Light spring
-Dense spring
-Brass spring
-Masses
-Ruler
-Retort stand
-Hook
-Recording devices

Procedure:

1. Hang the spring in a place where it is free to stretch. Mark the end of the spring in neutral position, or measure the length of the spring. 2. Hang a mass on the spring and measure the stretch from the neutral position, or measure the length of the spring and subtract the relaxed length from it. 3. Repeat step 2 for four more different masses.

4. Repeat the experiment for the other springs.

Observations:

Light Spring Data
Trial
Mass (kg)
Fg = Fs (N)
ΔX (m)
1
0.2
1.96
0.01
2
0.4
3.92
0.026
3
0.5
4.9
0.03
4
1
9.8
0.068
5
2
19.6
0.135
Dense Spring Data
Trial
Mass (kg)
Fg = Fs (N)
ΔX (m)
1
0.2
1.96
0.055
2
0.4
3.92
0.107
3
0.5
4.9
0.15
4
1
9.8
0.287
5
2
19.6
0.567
Brass Spring Data
Trial
Mass (kg)
Fg = Fs (N)
ΔX (m)
1
0.2
1.96
0.19
2
0.5
4.9
0.28
3
0.7
6.86
0.37
4
1
9.8
0.76
5
1.5
14.7
1.04

Analysis:

Light Spring
ΔX (m)
Fg = Fs (N)
0
0
0.01
1.96
0.026
3.92
0.03
4.9
0.068
9.8
0.135
19.6

Dense Spring
ΔX (m)
Fg = Fs (N)
0
0
0.055
1.96
0.107
3.92
0.15
4.9
0.287
9.8
0.567
19.6

Brass Spring
ΔX (m)
Fg = Fs (N)
0
0
0.19
1.96
0.28
4.9
0.37
6.86
0.76
9.8
1.04
14.7
Discussion:

1. What shape of graph did you expect? Did you obtain this shape? 2. What does the slope represent?
3. Compare the appearance of the springs with their slopes.

Prior to the experiment a linear shape was expected for the graph, this was due to the predicted direct relation between the applied force and the change in spring length. This shape was obtained after graphing the results, shown in graph 1. The slope calculated with the trend line on the graph, represents the spring constant. This is known because the calculations for both slope and spring constant were the same. The equation of finding the slope of a line is rise ÷ the run, which in this case was the applied force ÷ Δ x (the change in spring length). Additionally the equation for spring constant is the same; applied force ÷ Δ x. The appearance of the springs shows that with a greater spring constant (larger value slope) the spring had more of a resistance to stretching and did not expand as much in length.

Conclusion:

My hypothesis was correct in stating that with an increase in weight there was a directly relatable increase in spring length. Additionally each spring increased to different expected lengths, which could be predicted using the spring constant.

This was proven through the data collected which showed that the springs would increase in length with an increase in weight to a degree of its spring constant which was found to be; 142.76 N/m for the light spring, 34.446 N/m for the dense spring, and 13.621 N/m for the brass spring.

Some inconsistences, which could have affected the results of the experiment, would be;

Incorrect measuring of the spring
Not measuring the spring from the same point
The springs could have different size hooks on the end of them

Graph 1:

Brass Spring

Dense Spring

Light Spring
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