Spread Of Buddhism Dbq Essay

Satisfactory Essays
DBQ ESSAY

In response to the spread of Buddhism in China, these documents reveal how some people preached about it in their sermons and spoke publicly about it. They reveal how people wrote articles explaining how Confucius was wiser than Buddha. Some people even praised it along with other religions to show how together they helped mend society and government. Documents one and two both show examples of people responding to the spread of Buddhism throughout China through sermons and public speaking. These documents were definitely agreeing with the spread of Buddhism in China. I know this because the sermon in document one it lists all of the rules or noble truths one must follow in that religion in a positive way without listing
…show more content…
In both documents they discuss about how Confucianism is the right way to go. An example of this is when in document three it says, “If Buddhism is the greatest and most venerable of ways, why did the great sages of the past and Confucius not practice it?”. This quote shows how they believed that Confucius was wiser and they believed that if Confucius didn’t practice it then neither should they. Documents five and six both show how some people believed that Buddhism was just another beneficial religion to be practiced by the world. They believed that Buddhism, along with Confucianism and Daoism, brought traits to the people to help form a more orderly government. This is proven in document five when it says, “Confucius, Laozi, and the Buddha were the perfect sages”. So the people that wrote documents five and six agreed with the spread of Buddhism in China yet did not disrespect other religions. Another piece of evidence in document six shows how they believed these three religions to help their government when it talks about what would happen if we didn’t have the help and order of these religions, “In destroying law and injuring human-kind indeed nothing suppresses this doctrine!”

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    Buddhism is a path of practice and spiritual development leading to Insight into the true nature of reality. It is a religion that was founded in India in the sixth century BCE and was brought to China by the first century CE. When Buddhism was brought to China and it gradually won over converts, expanded throughout China, and influenced Chinese culture as we know it. In spite of Buddhism’s dissemination throughout China there were still Chinese people who didn’t convert to Buddhism due to their strong Confucian beliefs. The Chinese had two vastly different points of views about Buddhism.…

    • 896 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Although Buddhism was not accepted when it was first introduced to China, it has its positive aspects and was later on respected. In these documents, the authors- whether they may be a Chinese scholar, Confucian scholar, or a Buddhist scholar- display either animosity towards Buddhism, enthusiasm and encouragement towards the teachings of Buddhism, or a neutral opinion of not only the Buddhist ways, but the Confucian as well.…

    • 1058 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Buddhism in China was popular to some, but not to all. Here are many reasons as to why Buddhism spread as far as it did and why it did not spread farther. Even though Buddhism brought some order to China and did provide a little hope, it did not align with Chinese culture, and the Chinese people are very culturally centered.…

    • 518 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Dbq- Buddhism

    • 773 Words
    • 4 Pages

    As Buddhism spread into China, it was highly accepted into an empire looking to have a fresh start and establish a new or different belief system(other than Confucianism) to govern the state through, and many peasants and women supported this because they found welcome in this religion, while many others supported it merely for political gain. Buddha preached of four noble truths, all of which took people and their sorrows and helped them reach enlightenment; he applied his preachings to any person, which lead to popularity and the spread of religion (Doc 1). Zhi Dun, a Buddhist scholar, promoted the practice of Buddhism, referring to enlightenment and Nirvana as examples of Buddhism’s power. Zhi Dun, being a follower of Buddha, his statement was meant to strengthen Buddhism’s following (Doc 2). Around 500 CE, an anonymous Chinese scholar said in “The Disposition of Error” that Confucianism could not provide the same things that Buddhism could, but also recognized that both belief systems had value; his reason behind this was to say that Confucianism had not worked and that it needed to be replaced (Doc 3). Zong Mi, another Buddhist scholar, implied that Buddhism, Confucianism and even Daoism were all related (that they were all belief systems) and all had value; because he was part of…

    • 773 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Buddhism Dbq

    • 1187 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Before 570 C.E., a majority of Chinese scholars viewed Buddhism as a positive aspect of their culture. Right after the fall of the Han empire, China was in chaos and was not as unified as they used to be. The bureaucracy was weakened and China was politically unstable. The common people and the scholar-gentry class needed something to look to. Documents one, two, and three were all written before 570 C.E. and they demonstrate how Buddhism’s teachings benefit all people. Document one is according to Buddhist tradition and states that life is full of sorrow and that the only way to stop sorrow is by stopping cravings and selfish desires. By following the Four Noble Truths, people will be relived from their sorrow. Document two, written by Zhi Dun, states that whoever follows Buddhism’s beliefs and lives their lives purely will reach Nirvana and will not have to suffer anymore. Because of Zhi Dun’s high status…

    • 1187 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Ap World 2204

    • 530 Words
    • 3 Pages

    As Buddhism spread from India to China beginning in the first century C. E., it was met with mixed results. Many Chinese accepted Buddhism and defended its policies while others scrutinized Buddhism’s absence from past texts and used it as a scapegoat for political and social problems. Still others remained indifferent, wishing to meld the aspects of belief systems in China to create a unique Chinese culture. Documents 2 and 3 defend and support Buddhism in China, while documents 4 and 6 scrutinize it and discourage its spread. Documents 1 and 5 neither encourage nor discourage the religion’s spread, but provide a third perspective on how it should be dealt with. An additional document that shows the actual numbers of converts to Buddhism during this time, preferably in a graph, would be useful in determining whether or not the worries of the authors in documents against Buddhism were grounded.…

    • 530 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Pro Buddhism Dbq Essay

    • 624 Words
    • 3 Pages

    So, many Chinese officials looked to preserve Confucianism and enforce it. They did not want to replace a faith, centuries old, by a new culture not even developed in China. Document 4, by a Confucian scholar, criticized Buddhism for developing from a barbarian man who was from a different nation. He supports his claim by stating that Buddhism knows nothing of the ancient Chinese kings and defies ancient Confucian beliefs. In Document 6, Tang emperor Wu also supports this claim. He mentions that Buddhism was never heard of before the Han dynasty. He puts down Buddhism by saying that it depletes China's precious resources and destroys the ancient Confucian…

    • 624 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Buddhism Dbq Essay

    • 436 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Buddhism a religion some claim was founded by Barbarians’, some claimed was just as good Con- fusionism, and Laozism. The spread of this religion was for the most part responded to in a good way, because how it would help people prosper during China's rough times, but would become disliked by many cause of practices such as mutilating was self in offerings of Buddha.…

    • 436 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Buddhism is China DBQ

    • 528 Words
    • 3 Pages

    The first grouping is documents two and five, written by scholars who strongly favor Buddhism. The second was written by scholar, author and aristocratic confidant Zhi Dun circa 350 CE a time of dysfunction and war in China. It praises the benefits of living a Buddhist life, which include entering Nirvana, the level of Enlightenment and the extinction of desire and consciousness, with the ability to behold the Buddha. The fifth is from Zong Mi, leading Buddhist scholar favored by the Tang imperial household early 9th century. It offers that Confucius, Laozi, and the Buddha were perfect sages, and that there philosophies lead to a orderly society. It is unique in that it offers to coexist among the three and intertwine them to perfect society.…

    • 528 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Religions influenced many regions in similar ways. Buddhism and Christianity influenced many regions and both influenced two main regions that left them with a major impact. Buddhism was spread in a particular way which was also the way other religions spread, including Christianity. These two religions way of spreading influenced the world of today.…

    • 388 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    DBQ Buddhism in China

    • 657 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Documents 1,2, 3, and 5 can be grouped together because they all point out the reasons to support Buddhism. The Buddah (who was the founder of Buddhism) discussed “The Four Noble Truths” and that all things in life are driven by sorrow and passion. Because he is the founder of the religion, he obviously supports the traditions. Zhi Dun, an influential Chinese scholar in document 2 states the pleasures of Buddhism and encourages everyone to strive to reach nirvana. At a stressful when the Asian steppe nomads are invading Zhi Dun could have easily declared Buddhism a foreign scheme, but he chose to promote it instead. Because the government structure was weakening and everything the people were used to was falling apart they chose to turn to the new promising ways of Buddhism. Document 3 is similar in the fact that it is also written by a scholar. It also supports the ways of Buddhism and does it in an efficient logic based way. By answering direct criticism of its traditions the scholar comes across more persuasive to the people who have not yet decided whether they will support Buddhism or not. Document 3 proves that Buddhism will conflict with Confucianism because of its focus on each person individually. The “5 relationships of Confucianism” conflict with the self focus of Buddhism and this document takes the Buddhist side. Document 5 is a little different because although it supports Buddhism, it does not come out and say that Confucianism is wrong. By saying “all three teachings lead to the creation of…

    • 657 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Buddhism in China DBQ

    • 621 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Buddhism was first introduced to China in the first century C.E., a few centuries after it was first introduced in India. As expected, it was met with mixed results; some criticized it to the point of blaming it for the country’s social and political problems, some defended its beliefs and followed it without hesitation, and yet others remained pretty indifferent and wished to meld Buddhism with other religions and create a unique culture.…

    • 621 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    As Buddhism spread from India to China beginning in the first century C.E., it was met with mixed results. Many Chinese accepted Buddhism and defended its policies while others rejected Buddhism as a religion and solution to political and social problems. Still others remained indifferent, wishing they could meld the aspects of belief systems in China in order to create a unique Chinese culture. The people of China responded in different ways to the spread of Buddhism. Documents 2 and 3 defend and support Buddhism in China, while documents 4 and 6 scrutinize it and discourage its spread. Documents 1 and 5 neither encourage nor discourage the religions spread, but provide a third perspective on how it should be dealt with. An additional document that shows the actual numbers of converts to Buddhism during this time would be useful.…

    • 930 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    During this time of instability, many of the aristocratic people and people of the lower classes had different views and ways they wanted to spread and or discourage Buddhism. As seen in documents 3 and 2, the people explain how they support the spread of Buddhism in China. Document 3 speaks about how people during this time are used to their old ways of living which are counter-acted when the acts of Buddhism come into play. The questions are always defied by simple answers that explain how you cannot compare Confucian ways to Buddhism ways because they both run separate ways. Also, since he is a Chinese scholar almost implies that he/she could in fact be a slight upper class bias to the point. In Document 2, this partiality is also seen when Zhi Dun, another Chinese scholar portrays Buddhism shown as a joyful, light that will bring happiness to one who is interested in joining the religion. Zhi Dun, being a scholar also explains to the reader that his word does not tell how the lower classes felt during this time. During this time when China was being invaded by the early Asian steppe nomads, could have turned his back on Buddhism and declared it a distraction to the people, but that was not the case. During the time, Buddhism was a growing popular religion and was tested against Confucianism on multiple occasions. During this time, some people…

    • 824 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Buddhism Dbq Analysis

    • 1395 Words
    • 6 Pages

    In Document 4, Han Yu leading Confucian scholar and official of the Tang imperial court regards Buddhism in a negative way stating how the Buddhist ways do not conform to Chinese laws and that they culture is entirely different. He saw it as a threat to the Chinese ways that were previously kept. The POV of Han Yu was biased because as someone who is strongly educated on Confucianism, he is going to strongly fight for it to be preserved and primarily focused on in China. Historically, during this time period around 845 CE the Tang emperor did full-scale persecutions of Buddhists. Many temples and shrines were destroyed. During this time period, many Confucianists felt as if it was a threat leading to the complete wipe out of Buddhism in China and promotion of Neoconfucianism. An additional document needed is a merchant or artisan discussing how Buddhism has made their lives better in terms of trade and how it was compared to strict Confucian discipline. In Document 6, Tang Emperor Wu discusses how Buddhism is destroying China’s economy because people are not fulfilling their duties and are becoming monks instead. He states that, “this evil should be eradicated.” The POV of Tang Emperor Wu is biased because as a head figure of China, he wants Confucianism to remain put because it is the essence of China’s success and culture. Because he is an emperor, he wants the traditional philosophy’s to remain so that he can stay in power. Historically, during this year, all Buddhists were persecuted and all temples and shrines were destroyed in order to wipe out believers of Buddhism. This is why he states that the evil should be eradicated. An additional document needed is a graph of the percentage of society who followed Buddhism over the percentage that strictly wanted Confucianism beliefs. This is so that it will not biased since it is coming from a…

    • 1395 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays