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South Carolina Slavery Research Paper

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South Carolina Slavery Research Paper
South Carolina Slave
Tracy M. Farris
History 110
July 31, 2011
Professor Paul Heintz

South Carolina Slave

South Carolina considered slavery an essential ingredient to establish their rice crop plantations to generate the most amounts of cash. . The mentality of the South was to own as many slave as possible to produce the must amount of product without the cost of labor. The slave traders discovered that Carolina planters had a very idealistic vision how a slave should look - Tall, healthy, male, between the ages of 14 and 18, "free of blemishes," (similar to a sacrificial lamb) and as dark as possible. The demand for slaves to fit those descriptions allow trader to charge on average, between 100 and 200 sterling –
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The rice plantation had gruesome work environments. The fields were in the open fields of the South often filled with floods of muds that breed Malaria and other form of diseases that killed hundreds of slaves, for the lack of proper medical care. Proceeding to the American Revolution slavery was not a huge concern or had produces much debate, it was all about government power. But on the contrary was an issue that created problem. Traders taking slave and auction those to Christian nations apposed a problem. Ironically, trader by the time the American colonies began to grow or populate, they took the slaves from non-Christian parts of West Africa. It wasn’t an argument about slavery; it was all about church and its principles. The Constitution or the Declaration of Independence said it very clearly that "all men are created equal" and that people were "endowed by the creator with certain inalienable rights . . . So, it made it very difficult for the formers to include slavery into the …show more content…
The Declaration did not have a legal force. It was an attempt to communicate to Great Britain that the American Colonies were no longer a part of the British Empire. These self-truths or moral rights within the Declaration were later used to justify for cement of States to end slavery, but if a person was a salve at the time of the Revolution, they would have been long dead from old age by the time the Civil War would have resulted in their freedom. Granted the Constitution tolerated slavery, it also brought together the States as a single nation. This union assisted in what eventually help to put to end to slavery by allowing Abolitionist movements in the South to mandate an end to southern slavery. If the people had thought of themselves as separate countries, this movement would not have had as much traction. Both of then tacitly acknowledged that slavery existed, but did little either to protect or end the

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