Sonnet 130

Topics: Poetic form, Rhetoric, Love Pages: 1 (270 words) Published: February 25, 2009
This sonnet compares the speaker's lover to a number of other beauties and never in the lover's favor. Her eyes are "nothing like the sun," her lips are less red than coral; compared to white snow, her breasts are dun-colored, and her hairs are like black wires on her head. In the second quatrain, the speaker says he has seen roses separated by color ("damasked") into red and white, but he sees no such roses in his mistress's cheeks; and he says the breath that "reeks" from his mistress is less delightful than perfume. In the third quatrain, he admits that, though he loves her voice, music "hath a far more pleasing sound," and that, though he has never seen a goddess, his mistress unlike goddess’ walks on the ground. In the couplet, however, the speaker declares that, "by heaven," he thinks his love as rare and valuable "As any she belied with false compare” that is, any love in which false comparisons were invoked to describe the loved one's beauty. The rhetorical structure of Sonnet 130 is important to its effect. In the first quatrain, the speaker spends one line on each comparison between his mistress and something else (the sun, coral, snow, and wires--the one positive thing in the whole poem some part of his mistress is like. In the second and third quatrains, he expands the descriptions to occupy two lines each, so that roses/cheeks, perfume/breath, music/voice, and goddess/mistress each receive a pair of unrhymed lines. This creates the effect of an expanding and developing argument.
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