Solutions to the Niger Delta Problems in Nigeria

Topics: Petroleum, Niger Delta, Human rights Pages: 13 (4181 words) Published: April 12, 2011
SOLUTIONS TO THE NIGER DELTA PROBLEMS IN NIGERIA

AN ASSIGNMENT WRITTEN IN PARTIAL FULFILMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS OF THE COURSE DVS 512: TECHNOLOGY, ENERGY, NATURAL RESOURCES AND DEVELOPMENT BY

ISU, DORATHY AKWUGO
PG/MSC/07/46529

LECTURER: DR. OGAKWU

INSTITUTE FOR DEVELOPMENT STUDIES, UNIVERSITY OF NIGERIA, ENUGU CAMPUS.

AUGUST 2009

BACKGROUND
The Niger Delta produces the oil wealth which accounts for the bulk of Nigeria’s foreign earnings. Paradoxically however, these vast revenues from an international industry have barely touched the Niger Delta’s own pervasive local poverty (UNDP, 2006:1). The majority of the population in the rural areas in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria are living in extreme poverty in spite of the facts that a large percentage of Nigeria’s income is realized from the crude oil produced in that region.

The Niger Delta region usually refers to the nine oil producing states in Nigeria which are Abia, Akwa Ibom, Bayelsa, Cross River, Delta, Edo, Imo, Ondo and Rivers States. The region contains the world’s third largest wetland, with the most extensive freshwater swamp forest and rich biological diversity. Over half of the area is crisscrossed with creeks and dotted with small islands, while remainder is a lowland rainforest zone (UNDP, 2006:1).

The deteriorating social and environmental conditions, poor infrastructural development, grossly inadequate facilities and the general malaise in the area, has the effect of pushing out millions of young men and women to seek out uncertain alternative opportunities in the cities. Others become militants who constantly and consistently sabotage oil pipelines and vessels of the oil exploiting companies in Nigeria and kidnap their staff, causing huge financial losses and reduction in crude oil production. This situation also has the effect of making the Niger Delta regions highly unsafe for foreign investment.

Even the global economy has been negatively impacted by the crisis in Delta State. The state produces 30% of the country’s total oil and gas output which accounts for a significant amount of Nigeria’s current foreign exchange earnings. But the activities of the militants have accounted for a huge shortfall in the number of barrels of oil produced a day leading to a loss of billions of dollars in oil revenue. Thereafter, the world price of oil was affected and it dawned on the Nigerian Government that it had to act fast to save the economy from imminent collapse (Ero, 2009). Several efforts by the government, the most recent being the setting up of a Niger Delta ministry to address these problems have failed to yield much fruit. This paper takes a closer look at the problems of the Niger Delta region and proffers possible solutions to address the issues with a view to achieving sustainable development in the region.

THE PROBLEMS OF THE NIGER DELTA REGION
June 10, 2006 marked 50 years of oil exploration and production in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria. During the period over $400 billion has accrued to the Nigerian State in terms of revenue (Igbikiowubo 2006). The question then is how much of this revenue has found its way into this region for development purposes, particularly in infrastructural development and welfare of the people? This has been the bane of the crisis in the Niger Delta. The deteriorating social and environmental conditions, poor infrastructural development, grossly inadequate facilities and the general malaise in the area, has the effect of pushing out millions of young men and women to seek out uncertain alternative opportunities in the cities. Others become militants who constantly and consistently sabotage oil pipelines and vessels of the oil exploiting companies in Nigeria and kidnap their staff, causing huge financial losses and reduction in crude oil production. This situation also has the effect of making the Niger Delta regions highly unsafe for foreign investment. The Niger Delta Human...

References: African Network for Environment and Economic Justice (2004), Oil of Poverty in Niger Delta. Lagos, ANEEJ.
Chukuezi, C. (2006), Oil Exploration and Human Security in Nigeria: A Challenge to Sustainable Development. Retrieved from http://www.jsd-africa.com/Jsda/Fall2006/PDF/Arc_Oil%20Exploration.pdf on 27th May 2009.
Federal Office of Statistics (2001), Statistical News no. 327 August 2001 pp 5
Federal Revenue Account Allocation and Resource Mobilising Committee Abuja (2003), Federation Account Allocation Committee Files, January to September 2003.
Gary, I. and Karl, T. (2003), Bottom of the Barrel: Africa’s oil boom and the Poor. Catholic Relief Service, New York.
Human Rights Watch (2002), Nigeria: The Niger Delta – No Democratic Dividend. New York, Human Rights Watch.
Human Rights Watch (2007), The Human Rights Impact of Local Government Corruption and Mismanagement in Rivers State, Nigeria, The Human Rights Watch, Volume 19 no. 2a pp 13 January 2007. Lagos: Human Rights Watch.
Okecha, S. (2003), “Flames of Sabotage: The Tragedy of Youth Restiveness in the Niger Delta”. A paper presented at the Institute of Governance andm Development Seminar, Ekpoma (February 26-27, 2003).
The Guardian (2003), Niger Delta Development Commission (NDDC) in Action: Roads, Jetties and Water Schemes”. June 25, 2003 P. 47.
United Nations Development Programme (2006), Niger Delta Human Development Report. Abuja: United Nations Development Programme.
Continue Reading

Please join StudyMode to read the full document

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • The Conflict in Niger Delta Essay
  • Essay about Gas Flaring in the Niger Delta
  • Oil Exploitation and Conflict in the Niger-Delta Region of Nigeria Essay
  • Niger Delta Essay
  • problem solution Essay
  • Problem solution Essay
  • Problem Solution Essay
  • Problem Solution Essay

Become a StudyMode Member

Sign Up - It's Free