Top-Rated Free Essay

Social Studies Lesson

Topics: United States, Native Americans in the United States, Indigenous peoples of the Americas / Pages: 6 (1328 words) / Published: Nov 26th, 2011
Running Head: Social Studies Lesson

Social Studies Lesson
Angela Beehler
Grand Canyon University EED-465
November 20, 2011

In the social studies lesson plan it was about Native Americans and where they lived. First the teacher will be reading a book about the Native Americans. Then the students will get a worksheet that has a map on it where the students will write down where all the Native Americans tribes that were shown in the book. When the students get done as a class we will go over the map to make sure that all the students have all the names of the tribes. This helps to see if the students are following directions and listening to the story North American Indians. As a teacher the “Visual/Spatial - Students can create graphic organizers, charts, maps, or videos to demonstrate their understanding of concepts and/or relationships between concepts.” (Gardener, 1983) Helps the students in learning how to use a map and to understand where people are located on the map. The objective is for the students to learn where the Native Americans lived and what state they lived in during that time. Here are few example questions: The students will learn how to find locations on a map? How many different types of Native Americans we had live in each state? We can also use these questions or choose different ones for discussion to see if the students comprehended what the teacher read to them from the book. Here are the materials needed for the lesson today: History book, pencil, colored pencils map, North American Indians book, Atlas book and handout of the United States Map. Check for Understanding and have the students point out a few locations on the map where the Native Indians live. After the students finish pointing out where the Native Americans live on the map we will start the guided practice for the students to work in groups of two to write on the map where the Native Americans lived in the United States. If the work is not completed the students will finish it for homework for independent practice. For closure the students will be learning how to use a map. They will also be able to locate the different states where the Native Americans lived in. It will also help the students learn where each state is on the United States map. Here a few teaching strategies that were in corporate in the lesson to help improve it. One was direct teaching, questioning, inductive and problem solving, and cooperative learning. “The main purpose of direct teaching is to present knowledge and skills that will enable all students to master the material being taught. Sometimes this method is called direct explanation teaching.” (Chapin, 2009) This to help the students follow along with the teacher as she/he instructs the classroom on the material that will cover that day for that lesson in history. It is good to have good communication skills and be at ease talking in front of a classroom. Kauchak and Eggen (1998) state that questioning is the most widely used strategy in the classroom. It is used to instruct and to motivate learners and to diagnose their levels of understanding and reasoning. Effective teaching must involve careful attention to classroom questioning. According to Wasserman (1992) asking the right questions is the essence of good teaching. A sound guiding principle for all teachers was provided by Clopton (1992, p.30) when he wrote, 'Ask questions that build confidence'. Asking the right questions is essential it helps the lesson run smoothly. It will help the students to want to ask questions on what they are learning. It helps the students to build confidence in them as a person to be able to ask question and not be afraid to ask. Because no question is wrong if you the student want to find out the answer to that question. Inductive and problem solving is way for the students to explore their thoughts. It helps them to examine their ability to reach wide-ranging conclusions based on real or perceived patterns observed in specific events in real-life. This helps the students in history, math, and science also. It helps the teacher see how well the student is capable of problem solving. It is part of the assessment process the teacher has for her students. In cooperative learning this where the teacher is teaching the students social skills and how to interact with their classmates.” In cooperative learning, each member of the group must learn the subject matter or complete the task and is evaluated on his or her performance.” (Chapin, 2009) It is not easy to incorporate every strategy when you are teaching a class. It takes time to develop a good learning strategy that works for every teacher. As a new teacher we try to incorporate all the strategies in every lesson plan that we teach. But I think that we should at least try and use all of the strategies that will make us want to strive to become even better teachers for our students over the years to come. As a beginning teacher you don’t notice which strategy you are using until you think about at the end of the day when you think back on how your day went in school. It will be hit and miss in the first two years. Do the best that you can and reflect on what you can do in the future to improve and strive toward it.

Reference:
Gardener, H. (1983). Frames of Mind: Theory of Multiple Intelligences. New York: Basic Books
June R. Chapin (2009) Elementary Social Studies: A Practical Guide, Seventh Edition, Published by Allyn & Bacon. Copyright © 2009 by Pearson Education, Inc.

Clopton, E. (1992). Ask questions that build confidence. Mathematics Teacher, 85: 30.
Kauchak, D. and Eggen, P.D. (1998). Learning and teaching: research-based methods (3rd ed). Boston: Allyn and Bacon.
Wasserman, S. (1992). Asking the right question: the essence of teaching. Bloomington: Phi Delta Kappa Foundation.

Teacher: Angela Beehler
Subject Area: History
Grade Level: 4-6
Unit Title: Native Americans
Lesson Title: Children’s Atlas of Native Americans
Objectives The students will learn how to find locations on a map? How many different types of Native Americans we had live in each state?
Materials/Resources Needed: History book, pencil, map, North American Indians book, Atlas book.
Anticipatory Set First will be reading a book about the Native Americans. Then the students will get a worksheet that has a map on it where the students will write down where all the Native Americans tribes that was shown in the book. When the students get done as a class we will go over the map to make sure that all the students have all the names of the tribes.
Objective/Purpose Is for the students to learn where the Native Americans lived and what state they lived in during that time.
Input Discuss the book and ask the students questions on the book. For example: Where did the Indians live? Can you name the state? What was the story about?
Model Have the students point out a few locations on the map where the Native Indians live.
Check for Understanding Have the students point out a few locations on the map where the Native Indians live.
Guided Practice We will work in groups of two to write on the map where the Native Americans lived in the United States.
Closure The students are learning how to use a map.
Independent Practice If the work is not completed the students will finish it for homework.

Reference:
Douglas Gorsline (Apr 12, 1978) North American Indians, Published Random House Books for Young Readers
Rand McNally Children's Atlas of Native Americans (September 1992) Published Rand McNally
Blank Map of United States, retrieved from Nov 16, 2011 http://www.eprintablecalendars.com/images/maps/blank-map-of-the-united-states.jpg

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