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Slaughter House Research Paper

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Slaughter House Research Paper
Slaughter house animals and health related outcome
Claudia Santos
DeVry University

Slaughter House Animals and Health Related Outcome What happens in between the slaughterhouse and people’s kitchen is often overlooked, and many are still unaware of the horrors of industrialized factory farming. Truth is that the idea of your dinner happily grazing its way about the grass on a farm to your plate is a marketing scheme and pure fantasy. Animal treatment in slaughter houses is an issue that is not often discussed nor considered when making decisions about what to eat and how much this circumstance affects health. Although it can easily be seen that eating meat is a common way of living; there are many
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An awareness of animal maltreatment in slaughterhouses is not sufficient information to deter people from consuming unhealthy meat produced by the slaughter houses; therefore, more research to understand the etiology of diseases due to the treatment of animals should be considered. In addition, people from low socioeconomic status are the one’s greatly impacted; that is why this population should have better access to healthier foods, since both these ideas promotes healthier eating lifestyles while minimizing the consumption of slaughtered meats. More research to understand the link between the treatments of animals to the etiology of diseases should be conducted, in addition to awareness campaigns. Awareness campaigns such as the ones conducted by People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) and The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) are two of the largest organizations that help prevent animal abuse in the US and around the world. Such research, and organizations like the ones mentioned above, can increase positive decisions related to health outcome. When information about health outcomes is properly collected and analyzed, these outcomes may …show more content…
The perils of animal antibiotics. Retrieved from http://pmac.net/AM/antibiotic_perils.html
American Diabetes Association (n.d.). Lower your risk. Retrieved from http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/prevention/checkup-america/
CDC. (2011, August). Rethink Your Drink. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/healthyweight/healthy_eating/drinks.html?mobile=false
Gurung, R.A.R. (2010), Health Psychology: A cultural approach. (2nd ed.). New York: Wadsworth Publishing Company.
Healthy People 2020 (2012). Social determinants of health. Retrieved from http://healthypeople.gov/2020/topicsobjectives2020/overview.aspx?topicid=39
Natural Society (2013), Animals Raised Organically Are Not Given Growth Hormones or Antibiotics. Retrieved from http://naturalsociety.com/animals-raised-organically-are-not-given%20growth-hormones-or-antibiotics/
Pollan, M. Omnivore 's Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals. Retrieved from 1/e for DeVry University. Pearson Learning Solutions.

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