Skokie vs Collin

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Skokie vs. Collin In Skokie, Illinois Frank Collin wanted to march in the Village of Skokie, Illinois. Skokie had the most Jewish residents per capita in the United States at the time. His political views are representing the National Socialist Party of America because he was a regional leader of the organization. Frank Collin was eventually granted permission to march by the seventh United States circuit court of appeals by the ruling, “1st amendment is King”. The court also determined that the government couldn’t restrict expression because of a message, idea, subject matter, or content. In the case of Collin vs. Smith, I disagree with the ruling of the seventh US circuit court of appeals. Some people agree with the ruling because if the government were to deny the NSPA the right to march, it could have given the party even more political leverage against the very people who disagree with them. The NSPA could claim the unconstitutionality of the case ruling and would raise more political attention than they had already received. While society wants to morally deny the NSPA the right to march in a public park and express what some may refer to as hate speech, which only instills more political power in the NSPA. I disagree with this stance because if the court denies Frank Collin and the NSPA the right to march, than the court is not granting more attention and political power to them, it is simply following the rules established in the constitution. The NSPA could not use this court ruling against the United States to appeal the decision even further. This ruling would be consistent with all other forms of hate that were denied the freedom of expression. The marches, which were to take place, were certainly in the wrong place at the wrong time and in the wrong manner to promote general welfare and ensure domestic tranquility. Also, I disagree with the ruling of the court because the first amendment does not protect all speech such as hate speech,

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