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Single Parenting can be Benifical

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Single Parenting can be Benifical
Parenting can be Beneficial
Perhaps no other area in the social sciences inspires as much debate as the issue of parents getting divorced. While many marriages end in divorce and any such breakup of the marital union is understood to be a challenging and emotional event for anyone and everyone involved. Researchers are particularly interested in how divorce affects any children in the family. This effect has been the source of much controversy, as major studies in the past decade have found results are sometimes in direct opposition to each other. Even the methods used to conduct these studies is sometimes leaves suffering families confused and wondering who they should listen to.
In the article “Single Parenting can be Beneficial”, Sabrina Broadbent defends the ability of single parents to raise children. Her first claim states that divorce can renew fathers and mothers damaged by failing marriages and bring closeness, availability, and support to parent-child relationships. Drawing from her personal experience, Broadbent also claims that children, including her own, have adjusted well to single-parent households and do not perceive themselves as disadvantaged. She also speculates that many two-parent homes are essentially run by single parents, with one responsible for rearing children and the other earning income. Before the article is even set into motion Broadbent starts off with a question. Broadbent asks, "Could it be that once freed of the spousal system, fathers and mothers become better parents?" This question alone illustrates that Broadbent is a firm believer in divorce and she does not condone parents who stayed together through the child-rearing years. This quote also gives insight to the rest of the article and effectively creates interest in readers who are not obligated to continue reading.
After Broadbent’s begging statements, she makes her first claim. Due to the fact that Sabrina Broadbent was a teacher and a single parent when she wrote

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