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Should Exclusionary Rule Be Abolished Essay

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Should Exclusionary Rule Be Abolished Essay
Should the exclusionary rule be abolished? My answer to that is no. The exclusionary rule is one of the fundamental ways the rights of the all people are protected. Mainly the rule is to protect you from police power. If the exclusionary rule was abolished you will more than likely see police brutality on the rise. Officer’s, Detectives, etc will cut corners and otherwise ignore the basic rights of the people they serve. If the rule was abolished we will see sometimes innocent people put in jail just because the law enforcement officer thought they were a criminal. Basically we will take the rights to a fair trial away from the individuals. You will see a lot of evidence brought up in court that never insisted in the reports. Without …show more content…
Not that is not being done already but without the exclusionary rule the law enforcement officer wouldn’t need a warrant to invade that individual’s privacy. You will see allot of people’s rights being taken from them, the right to a fair trial, the right to have your privacy, basically shattering the Fifth Amendment of the Constitution, stating the no person can be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of the law. To take away the exclusionary rule is like taking away someone’s freedom as well. If you are not safe to talk in your household without someone tapping your phone’s, or just invading your privacy. That is not freedom you’re a slave in your own home. Searching someone’s home without a warrant is why we absolutely need the rule, the evidence obtained in the search will be held against you without this rule. Therefore the criminal acts that they already were working towards putting against you have now been more than likely doubled, because the evidence they found will be presented in court and will go as counts to your sentence. You will be in prison because the officer’s or detectives invaded your privacy and got more evidence against you. I believe the exclusionary rule is a very good law, it gives the people there right to life,

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