Self-Awareness and the Locus of the Self-Knowledge Development: a Comparison Study to Investigate Developmental Sequences Using Semi-Structured Self Concept Interviews
Topics: Identity, Locus of control, Open University, Conceptions of self / Pages: 14 (3281 words) / Published: Sep 2nd, 2013

TITLE

Self-awareness and the locus of the self-knowledge development: a comparison study to investigate developmental sequences using semi-structured self concept interviews.

ABSTRACT

This study examines the view that self-awareness gradually develops with a shift from physical to psychological characteristics whilst the locus of self-knowledge progressively transfers from others to the self. Previous research implementing semi-structured self concept interviews to investigate self descriptions amongst young children of various age groups supported these findings, underpinning the theories of a gradual emergence and elaboration of the self as a subject and the self as an object of knowledge. In the current study, a comparison between self descriptions has been conducted with slightly altered categories than those of previous research. The results showed a paradigm shift in the locus of self-knowledge as well as a more psychological reflection in the elder participant, further supporting the concept of an emerging sense of identity and self-awareness.

INTRODUCTION

Identity is multidimensional and may include physical and sexual identity, occupational goals, ethnic background and religious beliefs. The process of developing an identity begins with the awareness of children that they are separate and unique individuals (James, 1892 as cited in: Miell and Ding, 2005, pp.131-132). James (1892 as cited in: Miell and Ding, 2005, pp.131-132) theorised that this self-concept is not achieved in a single step; it's repeatedly revised during childhood in light of both cognitive development and social experience. As children get older, they become more competent at self-awareness and more realistically involved in perception and responses of others in their lives.

In the theory of the looking-glass self, Cooley (1902, as cited in: Miell and Ding, 2005, pp. 134-136) claims that the self is reflected in the reactions of other people, who are the "looking-glass"



References: Miell, D., & Ding, S. (2005). The early development of identity. In S. Ding, & K. Littleton, Children 's Personal and Social Development (pp. 125-139). Milton Keynes: The Open University. The Open University (2006), ED209 Child Development Methods and Skills Handbook (pp. 41-49). Milton Keynes: The Open University. The Open University (2010), ED209 Child development Assignment Booklet (pp. 20-30). Milton Keynes: The Open University.

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